New Mini Med School Series! Medicine of Cycling

Bicycles were first invented for transportation almost 200 years ago, but since then we have created many models of bikes and many modes of cycling, from mountain biking to racing in a velodrome. The Medicine of Cycling series addresses concerns of all types of cyclists, calling on professionals from a diverse array of disciplines to give advice on things from bike safety to finding the right bike for you.

The first episode in the series covers the various injuries that people suffer from riding bicycles and what is the best treatment. Dr. Kristin Wingfield, team physician for EXERGY 2012/16 women’s pro cycling team, visits the UCSF Osher Integrative Center of Medicine to talk about some of the common injuries and treatments cyclists receive.

Some injuries, like those that occur from a fall or collision, are often outside your control, but many injuries arise from intrinsic factors like overuse, personal health, and lack of proper bike knowledge or technique.

Watch “Cycling Injuries: Diagnosis and Treatment” to learn the correct ways to identify and treat bicycle injuries — and maybe event prevent them!

Stay tuned for more episodes in the Medicine of Cycling series.

MOC-logoWant more on the medicine of cycling? This series is just an introduction to a whole field of science dedicated to keeping cyclists safe. Visit medicineofcycling.com for more information about the group of doctors determined to give cyclists top quality care.

Also, the fourth annual Medicine of Cycling Conference is coming up in Colorado Springs, Colorado September 20-22. There is still time to get early bird registration if you sign up before August 15th!

Save Your Bones! Osteoporosis Update 2013

According to a recent study from the Center for Disease Control, Osteoporosis affects nearly one in ten people over the age of 50.

Osteoporosis is an impairment of the bones that results from low bone density and can lead to brittle bones, making them very prone to fractures.

As you age, you become more vulnerable to Osteoporosis — especially women, as estrogen levels decrease. Many other factors can increase one’s risk of developing the disease including high salt and caffeine intake, inadequate physical activity, smoking, and drinking too much alcohol.

The good news? Awareness can prevent complications and fractures through lifestyle changes that include diet, increased physical activity, and learning how to prevent falls which can be extremely dangerous for people with Osteoporosis.

Osteoporosis expert and Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at UC San Diego School of Medicine, Heather L. Hofflich, shares everything she’s learned about the disease in this month’s Stein Institute for Research on Aging public lecture.

Watch Osteoporosis Update 2013 for Hofflich’s tips on prevention and treatment:

Check out other videos from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging.

Dementia in Society

Dementia is a deterioration of cognitive function that begins with mild cognitive impairment, which appears just like forgetfulness, and eventually ends in death.

There are many causes of the disease such as stroke, chronic alcohol abuse and Alzheimer’s but there is no way to reverse the damage of the brain’s degeneration.

Dr. Mario D. Garrett of San Diego State University’s School of Social Work discusses the social impacts of dementia, such as the way dementia is classified by institutions and even the errors he has found in the way dementia is perceived.

Watch “Brain Fitness: Social Aspects of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment – Research on Aging”¬† from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging to hear Garrett explain the revolution in dementia studies and the necessity for dementia victims to have social interaction.

Watch this other video on Dementia with Dr. Berneet Kaur.

Fighting Food Allergies in Children

Every three minutes some one goes to the emergency room because of an allergy-related event.

When you have an allergic reaction to something you eat, your body recognizes a protein in the food and reacts against it. There are many different responses that can happen-rashes, hives, diarrhea-but, the most dangerous occurrence is when there is potential for anaphylaxis, which can cause death.

In this episode of Health Matters, Dr. David Granet talks with UC San Diego’s Dr. Stephanie Leonard who is the director of the Food Allergy Center at Rady Children’s Hospital here in San Diego.

More than 3 million people under the age of 18 have been diagnosed with food allergies, but Dr. Leonard says that number is on the rise. In a ten year period, she says, there has been an 18% increase in the diagnosis of food allergies in children.

Watch “Children’s Food Allergies- Health Matters” to hear the various theories behind why that number is increasing.

For more on food allergies, check out Food Allergies: Past, Present and Future.

A Career in Beer is Near

San Diego’s beer business is booming as the city is becoming known as the craft brew capital of the nation.

The beer industry brought San Diego $680.8 million in sales in 2011 and totaled $299.5 million in wages, contracts, and capital expenses. In 2011, there were 52 licensed breweries in San Diego county and since then 33 more licenses have been issued. As the industry grows, many new jobs are created and UC San Diego Extension is offering a way for you to get your foot in the door.

Watch this discussion, titled “Is Beer in your Career?” as some of the leading regional brewers, including Stone Brewing Company CEO and co-founder Greg Koch, Lost Abbey brewer Tomme Arthur, Ballast Point brewer and co-founder Yuseff Cherney, and the founder of White Labs Inc. Pure Yeast and Fermentation, Chris White, discuss the opportunities for those who wish to have a future in the craft brewing scene and the future of the industry itself.

Want more from inside the beer industry? UC San Diego Extension is offering a Brewing Certificate that will teach you everything you need to know to be a professional brewer. Also, catch some candid moments with Greg Koch.