CARTA: Human-Climate Interactions and Evolution – Past and Future

8232The existence of Beringia had a great impact on the spread of the human species only 16,000 years ago – and not long after, climatic periods like the Medieval megadroughts extending into the second millennium moved Vikings to Greenland, vineyards to England and played a role in the collapse of the Inca and Anasazi cultures.

And all this before humans took a role in shaping climate.

Now, according to earth scientists, paleontologists, and scholars in other fields, the planet has entered a new geological phase – the Anthropocene, the age of humans. How did this transition of our species from an apelike ancestor in Africa to the current planetary force occur? What are the prospects for the future of world climate, ecosystems, and our species?

In May, CARTA (The Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny) gathered the world’s foremost earth scientists, ecologists, and paleoanthropologists to address these questions – and with mostly dreadfully sobering evidence, they place the future of the planet squarely, and irretrievably, in our hands.

Watch Human-Climate Interactions and Evolution – Past and Future.

Is the Human Mind Unique?

There’s plenty that goes on in these heads of ours — sometimes more than we want or understand. But just how much does the way our minds work distinguish us from other species?

In the latest series from UC San Diego’s CARTA,┬áscientists from different fields discuss the cognitive abilities that are often regarded as unique to humans, including humor, morality, symbolism, creativity and preoccupation with the minds of others. They assess the functional uniqueness of these attributes, as opposed to the anatomical uniqueness, and whether they are indeed quantitatively or qualitatively unique to humans.

Watch “Is the Human Mind Unique?” and then tell that brain of yours to click on over to the CARTA video archive for more intriguing insights into what makes us human.

Human Origins: Lessons from Autism Disorders

This month we present another fascinating series from the folks at UC San Diego’s Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA) , who brought together the foremost rsearchers in the world to explore the newest understandings of the roots of autism spectrum disorders.

Tune in to “Human Origins: Lessons from Autism Spectrum Disorders” Wednesday nights at 9 (through December 19), or watch online.

Here’s the first episode in the three-part series, “Genetic Etiology, Surprising Findings in Autism, and The ‘Like-Me’ Theory for Connecting Self and Others.”

Monthly Highlights: June 2012

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Featured This Month
Program Highlights
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FEATURED THIS MONTH

Meet a Diabetes Hero!

On the season premiere of Taking Control of Your Diabetes, Urban Miyares, a legally blind Vietnam veteran with type 1 diabetes, proves that a “can do” attitude and effective management can turn an upsetting diagnosis into boundless possibilities. Dr. Steven Edelman talks with Miyares, an accomplished athlete in both skiing and sailing, about his remarkable achievements in the face of a medical challenge.

CARTA: Culture-Gene Based Interactions in Human Origins

In the latest programs from the Center for Academic Research and Training in Anthropogeny (CARTA), experts discuss how cultural traditions have shaped, and continue to shape, our genomes.

“The Skinny on Obesity” Wraps Up


Have you watched UCTV Prime’s “Skinny on Obesity” yet? Well, now’s your chance to catch up. The 7-part series concluded at the end of May and all the episodes — including bonus footage and a wealth of complementary web material — are available online for binge viewing. Of course, you won’t be binge eating much after you finish.

You’ll also want to check out “UCTV Prime: Cuts” Tuesdays in June for a carefully selected series of excerpts from the Dalai Lama’s April visit to San Diego.


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

All programs repeat throughout the month. Visit the Program Schedule on our web site for additional air dates and times.

Health & Medicine

Research on Aging: Sleep Disorders in Older Adults

Health Matters: New Melanoma Screening Method

Practicing Medicine Longer: Assessment of the Aging Physician

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Science

Perspectives on Ocean Science: From the Titanic to the Tiny

To Be Human: What Makes The Human Brain Human? with Terrence Sejnowski

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Public Affairs

China Airborne: Aviation and the Future of China with James Fallows and Peter Cowhey

Exploring Ethics: Henrietta Lacks and Human Subject Research: A Look at Past, Present, and Future

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Humanities Humanities

Neuroscience and the Emerging Mind: A Conversation with the Dalai Lama on Consciousness and Compassion

Burke Lecture: Interpreting Islam in Modern Context with Tariq Ramadan

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Arts & Music Arts & Music

La Jolla Music Society SummerFest 2008: Beethoven’s String Quartet in F-Major

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Check out the latest additions to our online video archive

To Be Human: The Verve: How We Became Modern with Seth Lerer

Research on Aging: Aging and Life’s Goodies: Wisdom, Resilience, and Sex

More videos and podcasts>>