Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer’s Disease, the most common cause of dementia among older adults, is currently ranked as the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

This series presented by leading clinicians and researchers from the UCSF Memory and Aging Center provides in-depth review of the neurodegenerative diseases of the brain, focusing primarily on Alzheimer’s disease. You’ll learn about the diverse clinical manifestations of Alzheimer’s, stages of illness, and current state of science regarding diagnosis, treatment and management of Alzheimer’s and other related diseases.

Early diagnosis can help preserve daily functioning for some time, even though the underlying disease process cannot be stopped or reversed.

Browse more programs in Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Diseases of the Brain.

All About the Brain

Explore the immensity of the human brain, its billions of neurons and trillions of connections, and the research that is helping us understand more about this complex and amazing organ.

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s popular lecture series returns with four new episodes each relating to the brain. The lectures are aimed at a middle and high school level and presented by LLNL scientists in collaboration with high school science teachers. This is a great opportunity to get a look at the cutting-edge science in a friendly and understandable way. Explore the immensity of the human brain, its billions of neurons and trillions of connections, and the research that is helping understand more about this amazing organ.

Browse more programs in Field Trip at the Lab: Science on Saturday.

Studying the Brain in Real Time

8232“Basic mechanisms in the brain have universal applications and are the road to medical discovery,” says Ralph Greenspan, PhD. He has spent his career studying how genes affect the brain and behavior of the fruit fly. This research has lead to a deeper understanding of mechanisms in the human brain. Hear about his current efforts to develop a full brain scale activity map and the technological and medical breakthroughs emerging from this work.

Studying the Brain in Real Time with Ralph Greenspan – On Our Mind

View more programs from the Brain Channel

Dementia in Society

Dementia is a deterioration of cognitive function that begins with mild cognitive impairment, which appears just like forgetfulness, and eventually ends in death.

There are many causes of the disease such as stroke, chronic alcohol abuse and Alzheimer’s but there is no way to reverse the damage of the brain’s degeneration.

Dr. Mario D. Garrett of San Diego State University’s School of Social Work discusses the social impacts of dementia, such as the way dementia is classified by institutions and even the errors he has found in the way dementia is perceived.

Watch “Brain Fitness: Social Aspects of Dementia and Mild Cognitive Impairment – Research on Aging”  from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging to hear Garrett explain the revolution in dementia studies and the necessity for dementia victims to have social interaction.

Watch this other video on Dementia with Dr. Berneet Kaur.

Is the Human Mind Unique?

There’s plenty that goes on in these heads of ours — sometimes more than we want or understand. But just how much does the way our minds work distinguish us from other species?

In the latest series from UC San Diego’s CARTA, scientists from different fields discuss the cognitive abilities that are often regarded as unique to humans, including humor, morality, symbolism, creativity and preoccupation with the minds of others. They assess the functional uniqueness of these attributes, as opposed to the anatomical uniqueness, and whether they are indeed quantitatively or qualitatively unique to humans.

Watch “Is the Human Mind Unique?” and then tell that brain of yours to click on over to the CARTA video archive for more intriguing insights into what makes us human.