Arthritis – From Snake Oil to Science and Success

8232Achy, stiff joints brought on by osteoarthritis have been experienced by many millions of people for a very long time. Experts have found skeletons dating to the Ice Age that show signs of osteoarthritis.

Sometimes called “wear-and-tear” arthritis, osteoarthritis is a common condition that many people develop during middle age or older. In 2011, more than 28 million people in the United States were estimated to have osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritis occurs when the protective cartilage on the ends of your bones wears down over time. Although osteoarthritis can damage any joint in your body, the disorder most commonly affects joints in your hands, knees, hips and spine.

Unfortunately, Osteoarthritis often gradually worsens and no cure exists. While new information and new medications may seem like magical cure-alls, it is important to take a deeper look before making treatment decisions. In this Stein Institute for Research on Aging presentation, Gregory Middleton, MD shares the symptoms and causes of OA, current treatments, and how to make informed choices about medications and disease management.

Watch Arthritis – From Snake Oil to Science and Success.

UCSD + PLNU = Great TV!

8232Our friend Dean Nelson celebrates the 20th year of Writer’s Symposium by the Sea, the wildly popular interview series that brings renowned authors from around the world to the beautiful campus of Point Loma Nazarene University for conversations about their prose and, in typical Dean fashion, lots of humor about the pain and suffering that lead to completed manuscripts.

Dean opens the 2015 series with Lysley Tenorio, author of “Monstress,” and then turns the interviewer chair over to his colleague, Karl Martin, for a talk with PLNU alum and screenwriter/film director Destin Daniel Cretton. Dean returns the final night for a feisty and revealing exchange with the literary luminary Joyce Carol Oates.

It’s been such great fun to bring this series to our viewers all these years and we know you’re watching, because the Writer’s Symposium by the Sea programs have been accessed more than 2.5 million times on our website. Happy Anniversary, Writer’s, and here’s to the next 20!

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Contributed by Public Affairs Producer, Shannon Bradley

Ed Abeyta on the Importance of STEAM Education

ed abeytaUCTV’s recently launched STEAM Channel is a platform for all things science, technology, engineering, arts and math. We sat down with the channel’s founding partner and director of K-16 Programs at UC San Diego Extension, Ed Abeyta, to learn more about the STEAM movement and how it impacts students, educators and parents.

UCTV: How did you get involved in the world of STEAM?

Ed Abeyta: STEAM became the framework for the creation of our K-16 division in 2010. It was inspired by Harvey White, co-founder of Qualcomm Inc., who believed the Arts (the creative skills) plus STEM are key for industry success. “STEM education is necessary but it is not sufficient – we must have STEAM education – our future is at risk otherwise.”

UCTV: Why STEAM and not STEM?

EA: STEM is based on skills generally using the left half of the brain and thus is logic driven. Much research and data shows that activities like Arts, which uses the right side of the brain supports and fosters creativity, which is essential to innovation. Clearly the combination of superior STEM education combined with Arts education (STEAM) should provide us with the education system that offers us the best chance for regaining the innovation leadership essential to the new economy.

UCTV: Why is STEAM so important for today’s students and teachers?

EA: There seems to be consensus that for the US to replace the lost jobs from the industrial sector we must create the new industries that will drive the future economies of the world – and that requires innovation. So we need to focus on examining some of the difference between what and how we “teach” today and what we need to change to effectively “teach” innovation. The underlying need is to refocus the system to teach innovation – not just facts.

UCTV: How is STEAM changing the way we think about education?

EA: STEAM is not about adding to the acronym, but instead adding to the relevancy of learning. As Vince Bertram, President and CEO, Project Lead The Way, Inc., noted “It’s about showing students how concepts relate to real-world situations and providing them with hands-on projects and problems that help them apply concepts in a new context. It’s about nurturing students’ curiosity and helping them develop creativity, problem solving and critical thinking skills.”

UCTV: Why should universities help lead the charge for STEAM in K-12?

EA: The core disciplines are beginning to merge. Visual Arts, Computer Science, and Engineering are working more closely to utilize expertise in each of their domains to solve problems. This mindset showcases what awaits the next generation at post-secondary institutions like UC San Diego.

UCTV: How can parents involve their children in STEAM education?

EA: At its heart, STEAM is about solving real-world problems. The world is going to need more and more graduates with the skills to identify problems, visualize solutions, design prototypes and implement solutions. Parents should seek every learning opportunity that incorporates practice based learning and challenge their children to continually think out of the box.

UCTV: What can viewers expect from the STEAM Channel in the coming months?

EA: The STEAM Channel will begin showcasing how STEAM is connected to research, policy, education, and industry. We will also seek to provide programming resources to enable parents, mentors and teachers to utilize our programming as a teaching platform.

Visit The STEAM Channel today!

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How did language evolve? New CARTA series explores the evolution of language.

8232Language. In all its forms. We use it everyday, all the time, without thinking, as innately (we might think) as a bird sings…

But the acquisition of this human capacity is a long and complex process, aided by neuro- and physiological specialization born out of the forge of evolution. So when you stop and think a moment, language poses many mysteries.

This new CARTA symposium brings together the world’s top experts in many facets of language to address those and other questions. When and how does language develop structure? What can the differences between old and new, spoken and sign languages, tell us about the evolution of language? Why and how does language evolve over time? And how have our brains evolved both with and for the purpose of language?

Watch this fascinating series on one of humanity’s essential elements: CARTA: How Language Evolves.

Understanding and Protecting the Planet at Scripps Institution of Oceanography

8232Research at Scripps Institution of Oceanography is more than SCUBA diving and working with marine mammals.

Margaret Leinen, Vice Chancellor for Marine Sciences, Director of Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and Dean of the School of Marine Sciences, reminds us that, in spite of the name, research at Scripps also includes the solid earth, the history of the planet and oceans, the atmosphere and even monitoring earth from space.

Take a look at how some of the latest research activities at Scripps are helping to shape worldwide conversations about the future of our planet. You will see through her presentation that the spirit of exploration that inspired the establishment of Scripps more than a century ago continues today.

Watch Understanding and Protecting the Planet.