Find out what it takes to succeed from the Technology Management Program at UCSB

8232Want to hear directly from successful people? Sit in with the students in the Technology Management Program at UCSB.

Imagine that you are a student at UC Santa Barbara and you are looking beyond your education to your career. You may excel in your course work but you know that being part of the innovation economy requires more than good grades and impressive academic achievements – it means a solid foundation in business principles.

This is the chance for you to sit in with the students in the Technology Management Program at UCSB and learn directly from those who have excelled through innovation and dedication to their work. It’s a rare opportunity to witness fascinating leaders engage with the next generation of entrepreneurs.

New programs include:

Kevin O’Connor, Founder Of Two Billion Dollar Companies & Working On Number Three

Waguih Ishak, Fortune 500 Intrapreneur On Nurturing A Culture Of Innovation

Jim Zarley, CEO & Chairman, Valueclick Inc. From Startup To Billion Dollar Exit

Bob Wood, Public Service CEO & Lifelong Mentor

Steve Zahm, The Art Of The Startup Pivot

More new programs to come! Browse the Technology Management Program archive to learn more and see what’s coming in the weeks ahead.

Rebecca Goldstein: Why Philosophy Won’t Go Way

8232At the heart of the latest work from acclaimed philosopher and novelist Rebecca Newberger Goldstein lies one question: is philosophy obsolete?

Goldstein recently visited the Helen Edison series for a lively conversation with Roger Bingham, Founder of The Science Network.

In Plato At The Googleplex, Goldstein proves why philosophy is here to stay by revealing its hidden role in today’s debates on religion, morality, politics, and science. Goldstein examines these themes by imagining Plato come to life in the 21st century. As he embarks on a multicity speaking tour, Goldstein asks: how would Plato handle a host on FOX News who denies that there can be morality without religion? How would he answer a neuroscientist who argues that science has definitively answered the questions of free will and moral agency? And what would Plato make of the idea that knowledge can be crowdsourced rather than reasoned out by experts? With scholarly depth and a novelist’s imagination, she probes the deepest issues confronting our time.

Goldstein holds a Ph.D. in philosophy from Princeton and has taught at Columbia, Rutgers, and Brandeis universities. She has been awarded MacArthur Foundation, Guggenheim, and Radcliffe fellowships and is a member of The American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Watch Plato at the Googleplex with Rebecca Goldstein.

Need more vitamin D? Step outside!

8232Our growing concern for skin cancer has given sunshine a bad name. New research on the benefits of sunshine – and vitamin D in particular – indicates that it’s time to make friends with the sun, once again.

You may know that vitamin D is necessary for Calcium absorption, but according to Dr. Robert P. Heaney of Creighton University, in the absence of adequate vitamin D, none of our body systems work well.

So what’s the best way to get enough? Good old fashioned sunshine. Vitamin D produced by sun exposure lasts 2-3 times longer in your body than a supplement.

But too much sun is still bad, right? Yes. You never want to burn. Excessive sun exposure can lead to skin cancer and premature aging (i.e. wrinkles). But too little can contribute to a host of medical problems including diabetes, certain types of cancer (yes!), hypertension, asthma, arthritis, and on and on.

The key is getting sun exposure in the proper “doses.” Dr. Michael F. Holick of Boston University Medical Center says that, ideally, we should be getting 5-15 minutes of sunshine on our arms and legs during the peak of the day, 2-3 times per week, followed by good sun protection.

Want to learn more about the science of vitamin D and sunshine? Then browse all of the videos in this new series, Vitamin D for Public Health, presented by GrassrootsHealth and the UC San Diego School of Medicine. Notable researchers discuss conditions affected by vitamin D, ways to improve patient outcomes, how to solve the deficiency epidemic and much more.

Then step outside for your daily dose of sunshine!

What’s Wrong with Racial Profiling?

8232Talk about timely.

The Suspect Race edition of “In the Living Room” jumps right into this taut and emotionally charged issue with social psychologist Jack Glaser and Oakland Assistant Police Chief Paul Figueroa.

“The problem with profiling, or using stereotypes to make judgments,” says Glaser, “is that it can have a self-fulfilling effect.”

Glaser presents research backing this claim while Figueroa responds with insight on how police officers feel in a climate where many sense that law enforcement is under attack. The erudite Henry E. Brady, dean of the Goldman School of Public Policy at UC Berkeley, hosts this candid and provocative conversation.

Watch more programs on The UC Public Policy Channel.

Story Hour in the Library

8232Good writing should be heard.

Watch some of your favorite writers as they read selected excerpts from their works. This prose reading series is hosted by UC Berkeley English department faculty Vikram Chandra and Melanie Abrams and features distinguished prose writers from the Bay Area and beyond.

Look for these new programs:

28831Jess Row
Jess Row, the author of “Your Face in Mine” and two short story collections, “The Train to Lo Wu” and “Nobody Ever Gets Lost” reads from his work at UC Berkeley. He has received a Whiting Writers Award, the PEN/O. Henry Award, and two Pushcart Prizes. In 2007 he was named a “Best Young American Novelist” by Granta. He teaches at the College of New Jersey and is an ordained Zen Teacher.

28890Joyce Maynard
Joyce Maynard has been a writer of both fiction and nonfiction since the age of 18. Her memoir “At Home in the World” has been translated into fifteen languages. Her eight novels include the newly released “After Her,” as well as “To Die For” and the New York Times bestseller, “Labor Day.” In addition to writing, Maynard performs frequently as a storyteller with The Moth in New York City, and is the founder of the Lake Atitlan (Guatemala) Writers’ Workshop.

29110And coming soon – Tom Barbash
Tom Barbash is the author of the new book of stories “Stay Up With Me.” Previous books include award-winning novel “The Last Good Chance” and “On Top of the World: Cantor Fitzgerald, Howard Lutnick, and 9/11,” which was a New York Times bestseller. His stories and articles have been published and performed on National Public Radio.

Story Hour in the Library celebrates the writers in the UC Berkeley campus community with an annual student reading. The event features short excerpts of work by winners of the year’s biggest prose prizes, Story Hour in the Library interns, and faculty nominees.

Visit The Story Hour for more from this series.