UCSD-TV Cameras Capture Colorful Carmen


Mezzo-Soprano Marina Domashenko

A view from backstage
 

Georges Bizet’s immortal masterpiece Carmen, opens as the third opera of the 2006 International Season on Saturday, March 25, 2006 for five performances. This new production of Carmen, designed by Tony© Award Winner Michael Yeargan, features an all-star cast including the house debut of Siberian born mezzo-soprano Marina Domashenko who has sung this role at The Metropolitan Opera, San Francisco Opera, Arena di Verona, Berlin and Vienna as well as having been immortalized on film in Franco Zeffirelli’s version of Carmen and in a new complete CD recording opposite Andrea Bocelli for Decca Records. She is joined on stage by returning tenor César Hernández, baritone Malcolm MacKenzie and soprano Barbara Divis. San Diego Opera Resident Conductor Karen Keltner leads the orchestra for these performances and American stage director Mark Lamos makes his house debut to direct.


Setting up the tavern for Act II

Tenor César Hernández
 
Carmen is a tragic story of obsessive love set in the passionate backdrop of Seville, Spain. Tempted away from his girlfriend Micaëla (Barbara Divis) by the gorgeous Carmen (Marina Domashenko), handsome solider Don José (César Hernández) is used and manipulated by Carmen and her friends to assist in a smuggling operation at their mountain hideaway. Carmen has fallen for the bullfighter Escamillo (Malcolm MacKenzie) however and her passion ignites and flames. No longer amused by Don José, Carmen casually dumps him but Don José’s obsession creates an emotional bonfire that threatens to destroy them all.


Interviewing Director Mark Lamos


Dropping the cyc

 
Chorus Master Timothy Todd Simmons and Maestro Karen Keltner
during rehearsal and the UCSD-TV Spotlight interview
 

Carmen is one of the most loved and most performed operas of all time with music that is instantly recognized by young and old alike. It features two of opera’s most endearing arias “L’amour est un oiseau rebelle” (Love is a rebellious bird) and “Toreador en garde!” (Toreador, be careful!).


Organizing large numbers of chorus members and supernumeraries

Moving the set pieces

Join UCSD-TV backstage to watch the creation of Rossini's The Barber of Seville at San Diego Opera

Gioachino Rossini’s comic masterpiece The Barber of Seville opens San Diego Opera’s 2006 International Season on Saturday, January 28, 2006. The Barber of Seville features an all-star cast led by famed British baritone, Christopher Maltman as Figaro and exciting coloratura tenor and Sony recording artist Lawrence Brownlee. Sensuous American mezzo-soprano Kirstin Chávez, Argentine bass-baritone Eduardo Chama and the renowned Italian bass Ferruccio Furlanetto round out the cast. San Diego Opera’s Principal Guest Conductor Edoardo Müller conducts and former San Francisco Opera General Director Lotfi Mansouri directs.

The Barber of Seville follows the exploits of Figaro (Christopher Maltman), “barber by day, matchmaker by night” as he aids Count Almaviva (Lawrence Brownlee) in wooing the beautiful Rosina (Kirstin Chávez), ward of the manipulating Dr. Bartolo (Eduardo Chama) who intends to keep Rosina to himself and marry her. Figaro infiltrates Bartolo’s guarded estate with the Count, disguised first as a drunken sailor and then as a replacement for music teacher Don Basilio (Ferruccio Furlanetto). This riotous romantic comedy will keep audience members in stitches with fast action, pranks and instantly recognizable music.

 
Rehearsal Photographs

Interview with Christopher Maltman and
Kirstin Chávez

Maestro Edoardo Müller

Kirstin Chávez and Christopher Maltman
rehearse a scene

Christopher Maltman and Lawrence Brownlee

Upstage sets

Calling the show

When Things Get Small Makes Comical Sense of “Nano”

LA JOLLA, November 10, 2005–Nano is today’s “buzz” word, popping up in almost any exchange or news report about the future of technology. But what exactly does this word mean? UCSD-TV’s new half-hour program “When Things Get Small,” premiering November 30 at 8PM, addresses these and other questions about the field by taking viewers of […]

LA JOLLA, November 10, 2005–Nano is today’s “buzz” word, popping up in almost any exchange or news report about the future of technology. But what exactly does this word mean? UCSD-TV’s new half-hour program “When Things Get Small,” premiering November 30 at 8PM, addresses these and other questions about the field by taking viewers of all ages on an irreverent, madcap, comically corny romp into the real-life quest to create the smallest magnet ever known. Funded by the National Science Foundation, and produced by UCSD-TV in partnership with Calit2, When Things Get Small was created by Not Too Serious Labs, the creative collaboration of Rich Wargo, science producer for UCSD-TV, and renowned UCSD physicist Ivan Schuller.

The half-hour program addresses several important “nano” concepts with entertaining effects, humor and comic invention, and illustrates answers to such questions as ­ How small is nano? What happens when things get small? And, how do you make things small? With special appearances by UC President Robert Dynes and Padres owner John Moores (disguised as a peanut-seller at Petco Park), the program is a departure from typical science-for-television fare.

Early feedback on the program has been overwhelmingly positive. An invitation-only sneak preview audience screened the program at the October 28 opening celebration of UCSD’s Calit2 building. Guests laughed and learned and the program elicited enthusiastic responses: “Entertaining and interesting,” “I keep wondering what nano is and I found the answer today,” and “It’s ‘Good Eats’ for sciences,” commented another viewer, referring to a popular Food Network program.

“The preview response is very encouraging,” commented Rich Wargo, UCSD-TV science producer. “In developing the program, we found research indicating that people actually learn better when humor is involved. So there is a method, not just madness here, and it seems to be working.” Wargo continued, “But commenting about all that is boring and pretentious – just enjoy the show. As one of our muses once said: ‘That’s All Folks!’”

“This program is a terrific example of the blending of science and entertainment, ” stated Larry Smarr, Director of Calit2, who screened the film at the October 28 sneak preview. “It fits wonderfully with Calit2′s mission of helping the public understand what research organizations like ours are doing and how it might impact their lives.”

For more information about “When Things Get Small,” including additional air dates, behind the scenes photos, or to view the program and the “making of” special on-demand, visit www.ucsd.tv/getsmall.

UCSD-TV Marks 10-Year Milestone with San Diego Opera

(Press Release) University of California, San Diego Television (UCSD-TV) proudly celebrates its upcoming tenth season of partnership with San Diego Opera, creating award-winning television with the series San Diego Opera Spotlight and OperaTalk! With Nick Reveles. The new season of OperaTalk! continues September 6 on UCSD-TV with The Barber of Seville at 8:00PM, followed by […]

(Press Release) University of California, San Diego Television (UCSD-TV) proudly celebrates its upcoming tenth season of partnership with San Diego Opera, creating award-winning television with the series San Diego Opera Spotlight and OperaTalk! With Nick Reveles. The new season of OperaTalk! continues September 6 on UCSD-TV with The Barber of Seville at 8:00PM, followed by the premiere of Carmen on September 13, also at 8:00PM. San Diego Opera Spotlight launches its tenth season on January 27, 2006 with a behind the scenes look at the San Diego Opera production of The Barber of Seville.

In 1996 the successful partnership between UCSD-TV and San Diego Opera began with San Diego Opera Spotlight, a unique and entertaining sneak preview of upcoming San Diego Opera productions. The program offers a behind the scenes look at how the singers, director, conductor and stage crew come together to create each breathtaking performance. The series will kick off its momentous tenth season on January 27, 2006 with the premiere of The Barber of Seville, the first performance of San Diego Opera’s 2006 season.

Two years after the series debut of Opera Spotlight, UCSD-TV and San Diego Opera launched a second series, OperaTalk! with Nick Reveles. Hosted by San Diego Opera’s Geisel Director of Education and Outreach, Dr. Nicolas Reveles, this half-hour program takes you through the story, music and history of the approaching season’s productions, offering valuable insights into what inspired the composers, the challenges they faced, the reactions of the audience and critics, along with recommendations of the best recordings. The eighth season of OperaTalk! on UCSD-TV continues September 6 at 8:00PM with The Barber of Seville, followed by the premiere of Carmen, September 13 at 8:00PM.

UCSD-TV producer John Menier has received several awards for San Diego Opera Spotlight programs: The Pearl Fishers (Silver Telly Award, 2004), Therese Raquin (Bronze Telly Award, 2004), and Ariodante (Gold Aurora Award, 2002). The Telly Awards is a national competition honoring outstanding local, regional, and cable TV commercials and programs, as well as the finest video and film productions. The Aurora Awards is an international competition designed to recognize excellence in the film and video industries, specifically targeting programs focused on regional or special interest entertainment.

“UCSD-TV’s long association with San Diego Opera has been uniquely rewarding, both for San Diego viewers and for me, personally,” shared UCSD-TV arts and humanities producer/director John Menier. “Thanks to the Opera and to Nick Reveles, I’ve learned more about this art form than anyone has a right to know.”

“Ten years ago this partnership was a ground-breaking event which has benefited both San Diego Opera and UCSD-TV in so many ways,” stated San Diego Opera general director Ian Campbell. “I am grateful that the leadership at UCSD-TV had the vision to risk such an undertaking which has always been supported to the fullest at all times. I want to give special recognition to John Menier and Matt Alioto [associate producer, principal photographer] whose artistry in producing our programs has been extraordinary, and for whom excellence is never good enough – they always set themselves even higher standards.”

San Diego Opera, ranked by OPERA AMERICA as one of the top 10 opera companies in the United States, is a widely respected member of the international opera community and an invaluable cultural resource to the San Diego community. The Company is both a national and regional model for all arts organizations in terms of artistic product, impact of community education and outreach and consistently sure-footed fiscal management.

White Mountain Wins Emmy

(Press Release) La Jolla–In the Shadow of White Mountain received a prestigious Emmy award for Best Documentary by the Pacific Southwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The program’s producer, Rich Wargo of UCSD-TV, accepted the award at the 31st Annual Pacific Southwest Emmy Awards ceremony held on June 18, […]

(Press Release) La Jolla–In the Shadow of White Mountain received a prestigious Emmy award for Best Documentary by the Pacific Southwest Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The program’s producer, Rich Wargo of UCSD-TV, accepted the award at the 31st Annual Pacific Southwest Emmy Awards ceremony held on June 18, 2005 at the Omni San Diego Hotel.

In addition to the Emmy recognition, “In the Shadow of White Mountain” was recently honored with a “Certificate for Creative Excellence” by the United States International Film and Video Festival’s 38th Annual Awards competition. In early 2005, the documentary received a bronze Telly Award, an international competition honoring outstanding local, regional, and cable TV commercials and programs, as well as the finest video and film productions.

“These awards represent the hard work of everyone involved in the program,” says Wargo. “The White Mountain research station and the people who work there are truly a special part of my life, and I hope we can share their passion and my special fondness for this place–as well as some dispassionate science–with the audience.”

Nearly three years in the making and featuring the distinctive voice of narrator Peter Coyote, “In the Shadow of White Mountain” tells the many stories of the White Mountain Research Station (WMRS), a biological field station with both the highest research lab and the highest Internet node in North America. The hour-long documentary includes segments ranging from the extreme hibernation of White Mountain’s squirrels to what the evolution of the Willow Beetle can tell us about climate change. The program was made possible by a grant from the National Science Foundation through its Divisions of Biological Infrastructure and Elementary, Secondary and Informal Science Education. More information about the program, including photos, a look behind-the-scenes of the production, and links to view the program “on-demand,” visit http://www.ucsd.tv/whitemountain.

The purpose of the Emmy Awards is to recognize outstanding achievements in television by conferring annual awards of merit in the Pacific Southwest region. The Pacific Southwest region includes San Diego County and the television markets of Bakersfield, Oxnard, Palm Springs, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara and Santa Maria, California, and Las Vegas, Nevada.