The Atlantic Meets the Pacific

Want to hear from the doctors at the forefront of Obama’s BRAIN initiative? Or, learn about the cutting edge of drone science intended for personal civilian use? Or, get a guided tour inside the Scripps Research Institute and the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine?

Well, you can do all those things at this year’s The Atlantic Meets the Pacific. This third annual conference, presented by The Atlantic Magazine and UC San Diego, gathers top thought leaders in technology and health to discuss their ground breaking research in panels and interviews.

This year’s speakers will include top UCSD scientists such as Eric Topol, Todd Coleman, Scott M. Lippman, Jacopo Annese, Ralph J. Greenspan; business and technology leaders like Roni Zeiger and Chris Anderson; and prize winning journalists and authors such as Laurie Garrett, Deepak Chopra, Clifton Leaf, and many many more!

The Atlantic Meets the Pacific will take place here at UCSD on October 2 through 4. If you can’t attend, don’t worry! UCSD-TV will be there will to catch all exciting speakers.

Can’t wait for the conference? Check out UCSD-TV’s coverage of last year’s The Atlantic Meets Pacific!

Watch a video from last year’s The Atlantic Meets the Pacific of Dr. Eric Topol explaining his new medical device that could revolutionize healthcare in a very personal way. What will he talk about this year?

See other videos from UCSD-TV’s coverage of The Atlantic Meets the Pacific!

Adventures on an Ultrasmall Scale

The National Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI) defines nanotechnology as “science, engineering, and technology conducted at the nanoscale, which is about 1 to 100 nanometers.”

Wait, the United States has a research and development program dedicated to this tiny field? Yes, we do. The NNI was established in 2000 to assist in the collaboration of new nano sciences and to ensure responsible development.

This small scale science can be applied to all other fields of science, from chemistry to engineering, aiming to study and manipulate molecules and atoms at an individual level. Nanotechnology has only been around for abut 30 years, because without today’s ultraprecision machines and microscopes, we could not see such small particles.

One of the most popular recent nano-inventions is graphene, a crystalline form of carbon one atom layer thick. Learn more about the developments of nanotechnology from Buford Price, Professor of Physics at UC Berkeley, in “Adventures on an Ultrasmall Scale,” as he takes us through nuclear tracks in solids to microbial life in polar ice.

If you like this video, check out the other programs in the Frontiers of Knowledge series!

Women in Science

Our recent series, “Women in Science” was so popular, it has been given it’s own subject page!

UCSD-TV wants to acknowledge the accomplishments of women in science, with the hope of nurturing more female scientists and encouraging other women to get involved in this exciting field.

There have been many great women scientists whose discoveries have been undercut based on their gender. For example, Rosalind Franklin remains the unsung hero who played a pivotal role in the discovery of DNA’s double helix structure with her X-ray diffraction images. She was out-shined by Watson and Crick, the two men who took full credit for the discovery.

And Rachel Carson, the author of “Silent Spring,” faced many personal attacks on her intelligence and credibility because she was smart enough to recognize and brave enough to tell about the devastation caused by large chemical companies. These corporations claimed that because she was a woman her facts were not to be trusted.

Although we would like to think that these sort of prejudices have faded from society, it is important to remember heroes like Franklin and Carson to celebrate women’s scientific accomplishments of the past and support women’s future in science.

Available_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824Check out the Women in Science subject page and the podcasts available on iTunes!

The Future of Human Space Exploration

We’ve been to the moon and we’ve explored remote corners of our universe. What is next in our quest to unlock the secrets of our solar system?

Hear from Charles Kennel, chair of the National Academy’s Space Science Board and former Scripps Institution of Oceanography director, as he reviews NASA’s past accomplishments, present projects, and anticipated goals in “The Future of Human Space Exploration.”

To see more programs on Astrophysics and Space Science, visit our archive.

Prepare for the Perseid Meteor Shower

perseidThe Perseid meteor shower has been observed streaking though our night sky for over 2000 years. In early to mid-August, Earth passes through the debris stream of the Swift-Tuttle comet. As space dust hits the atmosphere it creates extremely bright meteors know as the Perseids. The best nights to view the shower this year are August 11th and 12th, with meteors starting as early as 10 pm and increasing in frequency until dawn. Grab a lawn chair, head outside and enjoy the show!

Want to know more about the bright lights above? Check out UCSD-TV’s Astrophysics, Cosmology, Astronomy, and Space Sciences programs.