On Location: State of Minds Crew at UC Santa Cruz

UCTV’s State of Minds crew was on the UC Santa Cruz campus last week shooting host segments for the Spring 2010 edition (premiering later this month). Executive Producer and host Shannon Bradley reports from the field: We spent a good part of last week shooting for State of Minds at UC Santa Cruz. What a […]

UCTV’s State of Minds crew was on the UC Santa Cruz campus last week shooting host segments for the Spring 2010 edition (premiering later this month). Executive Producer and host Shannon Bradley reports from the field:

We spent a good part of last week shooting for State of Minds at UC Santa Cruz. What a gorgeous campus!

Our contact there, Guy Lasnier, was extremely helpful in arranging locations for our host segments and in setting up our interview with Olga Nájera-Ramírez, the anthropologist who just finished a beautiful documentary on Folklórico dance. We’ll feature clips from her film in our show, along with stories from Rich Wargo on Jose Restrepo, a UC San Diego structural engineer who surveyed the earthquake damage in Chile; Paul Pfotenhauer’s piece on the new, green Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science at UC Davis; and a segment from our newest correspondent, Carla Yarbrough at UC Riverside, on researchers who are creating the perfect grass – green turf that doesn’t need much water.

Here’s our crew, Matt Alioto (right) and Ken Zukin (left), along with Guy Lasnier (center), as we set up at Terra Fresca Restaurant for the intro into Paul’s story on food and wine:

Here’s Guy (closest) being drafted into carrying gear with Matt and Ken out to a scenic vista overlooking the Great Meadow.

We chose this spot to introduce Carla’s piece on drought-tolerant turf (from left to right, Matt, Ken, Guy):

Here’s a post-interview shot with Olga Nájera-Ramirez (center), her former graduate student, Russell Rodriguez (left), and me (right). I talked with the two of them about making “Danza Folkórica Escénica: El Sello Artístico de Rafael Zamarripa,” a documentary featuring the acclaimed folklórico choreographer. Olga and Russell first met Zamarripa as young folklórico dancers more than 30 years ago. Their film traces the development of this traditional Mexican dance form through Zamarripa’s experiences and artistic productions.

And finally, a fan spies on our production:

Read more about the visit and see additional photos at this article from UC Santa Cruz.

– Shannon Bradley

Monthly Highlights: May 2010

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A Whole Lotta Shakin’ Going On

San Diego’s had quite a few tumblers lately and, with additional earthquakes occurring around the world, a lot of us are feeling pretty shaky ourselves. Check out these earthquake-related programs that’ll help you understand what’s behind the quakes, how engineers are making our buildings safer, and what you can do to be better prepared.

Paths to Peace in the Middle East

Navigating negotiations in the volatile Middle East is a challenge yet to be met, and it seems to grow more complicated by the week. Tune in this month for several perspectives that offer the valuable context you need to really understand this complicated process.

Can Obama Bring Peace to the Middle East?
Steven Spiegel, the director of UCLA’s Center for Middle East Development, shares the innovative and informal negotiation techniques that he is urging the Obama administration to employ as it pursues security in this historical volatile region.

Achieving a Just Peace in the Middle East with Nasser Barghouti
The President of San Diego’s American-Arab Anti-Discrimination League examines the root causes of conflict in the Middle East and offers a vision for resolution that he argues is based on universal concepts of human rights.

Amb. Michael Oren: US-Israel Relations from a Historical and Personal Perspective

Israel’s Ambassador to the United States recounts the long history of shared goals between the US and Israel and outlines how the two countries can work together for peace in the Middle East.

In Memoriam: Craig Noel

We mourn the recent passing of local theater legend Craig Noel. In 2005, Noel visited the UCSD-TV studio and sat down for a chat with another local legend, Jack O’Brien. Tune in for an encore presentation of this wide-ranging conversation about Noel’s storied 70-year career with The Old Globe.

A Theatrical Life: A Conversation with Craig Noel

The Evolution of Human Biodiversity

From the brain, to immunity to entire populations, the Evolution of Human Biodiversity series explores the many facets of human biodiversity from where it begins — in our genetic makeup.

Tune in Thursday nights at 6 for this fascinating fix from the Center for Academic Research and Training in Antrhopogeny (CARTA).


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

All programs repeat throughout the month. Visit the Program Schedule on our web site for additional air dates and times.

PUBLIC AFFAIRS

State of Minds: Folklorico, Green Design, Drought-tolerant Turf (Spring 2010)

SCIENCE

Solar Activity During the Last Millennium

TeacherTECH: Using Google Earth

Art and Science in the Age of Enlightenment: From Newton to the Bill of Rights

HEALTH & MEDICINE

Health Matters: Down Syndrome

About Health: Smoking Cessation

ARTS & MUSIC

Lytle Memorial Concert: Liszt-O-Mania

Making Lilith



NEW TO VIDEO ON-DEMAND

Please visit Video On-Demand to view the latest additions to our online video library. All programs can be viewed in RealPlayer.

Pt. Loma Writer’s: An Evening with Bill McKibben

Health Matters: Family Medicine

UC San Diego Jazz Camp: Johnnie’s Corner Song

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Hunting the Higgs: The Rediscovery of Physics

I had titled the last blog pedal to the metal, but as a tyro impressed by the gargantuan machine and counter intuitive contrasts of scales – I really had no idea. Yes, the CMS logged hundreds of thousands of p-p collisions in a day or two. But they were a bit like Saturday afternoon slow […]

I had titled the last blog pedal to the metal, but as a tyro impressed by the gargantuan machine and counter intuitive contrasts of scales – I really had no idea. Yes, the CMS logged hundreds of thousands of p-p collisions in a day or two. But they were a bit like Saturday afternoon slow pitch, or in deference to my Mentor in this endeavor – backyard bowling practice – as compared to fast yorkers and googlys at the Cricket World Cup.

Man-on-the-scene Matt LeBourgeios on March 30, 2010

As explained to me by our man-on-the-scene Matt LeBourgeois, the last week or so was only preparation for what Vivek calls “The Rediscovery of Physics”. Even though my occasional visits to the LHC status page showed 7TeV beams and what looked to me like a lot of luminosity (they were, and there was), there were a lot of not-so-subtle nuances to what was going on. Last week or so was the beam operators; the people responsible for injecting protons into the 27 kilometer race track and providing focused, stable and energetic beams tuning their instrument to perfection.

The line traces the 27 kilometer track of the LHC on the French – Swiss countryside…

As Matt related, the operators maintain that what they provided in that first week or so was not intense enough for “discovery physics”; that is, really compelling huge numbers of protons to collide – but it was exciting enough for our young Ahab (I’ll get to that in a later blog) to whet his appetite.

Actually, it was the opportunity CMS needed to tune its instrument, doing among other things something called timing scans, which has to do with setting the triggers on the CMS. This is the realm where Matt works, where he is one of many monitoring all sorts of different parameters and data involved with timing to make sure things are working, or for working out problems when they arise. In his typically gracious manner he calls himself “just a pawn.” I’ll maintain whatever one does on this job is going to mean something pretty darn important one day. Anyway, as Vivek explained, the CMS is like a 100 million pixel camera. The catch, as Matt pointed out, is that each pixel has its own shutter, here in his own words: “the point of the timing scan is to sync the 100 megapixels of the camera. Instead of thinking of having to hit one camera button to take a snap shot, think of it as each ‘pixel’ has its own button, and these timing scans ensure that we are hitting all 100 million buttons at once.” Whew! I can only assume if that doesn’t happen, the resulting “picture” lacks focus.

So CMS now has the shutters timed and the beam operators are really putting the pedal to the metal. The latest from Vivek is “…now squeezing the beams like hell – so more rapidfire collisions”. What? Vivek explained that the beams that collided on March 30 were something like the diameter of a hair, now the operators are tuning the beams to be something much thinner (?!!)- with the same number of protons in the beams. They’re focusing and concentrating the beams. Why? Same number, smaller space = greater density = greater luminosity. Vivek has a vivid description of those less focused March 30th beams in this video clip.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Another way to put it is like shooting two shotguns at each other – you get two bunches of shot, each with 10 to the 11th pellets (that’s like, oh, a hundred billion pellets in each), flying towards each other in the hope that some of the pellets hit directly head-on with all their momentum going into their mutual deconstruction. The more concentrated the shot pattern, the better the odds of collisions. So when the operators can provide focused, stable beams, then people like Vivek and Matt and their colleagues can really do their work – which is PHYSICS; and the operators can post messages like “enjoy the collisions” and “physics beams” on the LHC status page here. Now I’ve simplified, and probably to the horror of physicists out there, over-simplified this. Be certain, there are a lot of precise and very specific protocols involving terms like beta-star and picobarns that indicate the level of performance and quantity of data the physicists are getting – very strict parameters that are adhered to, because remember-they’re working with things we can’t see, have never seen before, and whose existence we can only infer, albeit very precisely and with great certainty, but only through the evidence they leave behind.

So what is that evidence? Well in the energy range – or mass – (remember it ALL boils down to this – E=mc2) in which the LHC will be looking for the next year or so, the signature of a Higgs boson of about the mass of an entire gold atom (which is about 185 GeV!), will be the remains of two W bosons. And that – which Matt and Vivek and a few thousand others will be looking for – will be events that show specific combinations of electrons, muons, or electrons and muons AND their corresponding neutrino counterparts, which show up only as a precise amount of missing energy – something called Missing Transverse Energy. If the event shows all three of those parameters to an exceedingly high degree of certainty, then it will get some interest, and Vivek, Matt and a world of physicists will pore over it. The catch is, one event won’t be telling. They need several such events, enough to satisfy something called 5 sigma criterion – I know you all know what that indicates, sorry I’m playing catch up, but for those like me, it is a term describing a statistical certainty to a level of less than one fault in a billion. In other words, there is only less than a 1-in-a-billion chance that they’re wrong. So you need a lot of incontrovertible events, and to get several such events…you need thousands, millions and ok I’ll hyperbolize, (but I have a feeling it isn’t really hyperbole) – probably billions of p-p collisions to get those events. Just to add another twist, as Matt told me the other day, W boson production, without the creation of a Higgs first is almost a hundred times more likely to occur. So there will be a lot of W bosons that show up WITHOUT evidence for Higgs….hence, collisions, collisions, collisions, “squeeze the hell” out of those beams. And then there are the usual gremlins encountered with complex systems. Vivek recently showed me how one such event looked interesting, but one of the parameters was due to an instrumental glitch – so, “close but no cigar” and into the trash with that one….so, collisions, collisions, collisions.

In the meantime, as the operators keep perfecting their craft, “squeezing the hell” out of the beams, with the p-p events occurring at an ever accelerating rate, Vivek and company are happy to do what Vivek describes as “Rediscovering Physics”. It isn’t just an idle exercise or coincidence of smashing protons. As of the Ides of April Vivek explained that the LHC has “discovered” every major particle revealed in the 20th century, up to about 1983, when Carlo Rubbia discovered the the W and Z bosons. Or that is – it has rediscovered them, and this is important why?

This is a new instrument, a new machine, and as Vivek explained, if you don’t see what you already know about with this machine, then you may have a problem with your instrument, and basically, you can’t trust the results….So now, working at heretofore unattained energy the LHC has tallied a gamut of fundamental particles, starting with the pi mesons of 1947. Their discovery bolstered the existence of Up and Down quarks. Oh, and the LHC attained this in the first 15 minutes of operation at 7TeV. Then it was the Strange (50′s) and Charm quarks of the 70′s and on and on. As of this writing they’re still in the hunt for the last few particles – variations of the Z boson, a hunt which might end at any moment the way they’re smashing zillions of protons (my hyperbole). Even for a naive eye the data is totally convincing, you’ll be able see it soon when it is published and when you do, I think you’ll agree it’s waaaay 5 sigma. And that’s a good thing. The LHC is seeing what it is supposed to be seeing – so when new things show up – those electron-neutrino (elnu), muon-neutrino (munu), MTE (Missing Transverse Energy) triptychs of data – Vivek and friends will know it isn’t a phantom – but instead, perhaps, the sign of the holy grail, the great white whale, or as it has been called – the god particle…..Bonne Chasse mes amis!

Hunting the Higgs – scenes from March 30, 2010 – it’s pedal to the metal

First of all, we are grateful for Matt LeBourgeois who recorded all this unique and singular footage, more of which you will see in UCSDTV’s chronicle of his and Vivek Sharma’s experiences during the first year of the Higgs search. Matt got it good, where the rest of the media can’t…. Just moments after the […]

First of all, we are grateful for Matt LeBourgeois who recorded all this unique and singular footage, more of which you will see in UCSDTV’s chronicle of his and Vivek Sharma’s experiences during the first year of the Higgs search. Matt got it good, where the rest of the media can’t….

Just moments after the first 7TeV proton collision ever recorded occurs in the Compact Muon Solenoid detector – for which Vivek directs the Higgs search, Matt caught Vivek’s comments as the first record of the event appeared.

Click here to view the embedded video.

Now that the big press event has subsided, and the terms LHC, CERN and Geneva fade as our attentions are prodded to such things as Ricky Martin’s personal life, the economic recovery and improving relations with China (unless you’re Google)-all issues with varying degrees of import; the real work for thousands of scientists begins. As Vivek so prosaically put just moments after viewing the record of the very first 7TeV proton collisions ever created “…the events are beautiful, the detector is working like a dream….you know, it’s taken twenty, twenty-five years to build and this is what it is for, finally, the baby is delivered, now it has to grow…”.

And they are quickly exhorting their baby to take its steps and grow. Shortly after the champagne corks were gathered up and the press hit “send” to file their media, Vivek’s cohorts in this huge endeavor slowly, or not so slowly, started putting the pedal to the metal. Still basking in the excitement, Vivek hints at what the next steps for their baby would be:

Click here to view the embedded video.

And as later reported by Vivek, on the very same day the CMS recorded more than 500,000 p-p (proton-proton) collisions in just a few hours. And on Wednesday and Thursday of this auspicious week, they accumulated more than four million collisions at 7TeV, with plans to increase the collision rate by orders of magnitude in the next weeks. Baby steps indeed….

So just what are we looking at in this video? Vivek explains in response to a presumably UK journalist:

Click here to view the embedded video.

Their baby – our baby – has started the marathon, and we’ll be pacing alongside with Vivek and Matt. Keep checking back, and don’t forget to use your iPhones and browsers to take a peek at LHC status, and in a way, take part, however vicariously, as we venture on into this new epoch of understanding that started just a few days ago.

New Project – The Dawn of a New Era: Hunting the Higgs

These are the first things I looked at when I awoke this morning Apologies folks, but I can’t resist the tendency to the poetic. It’s an irresistible force. Yes, they look like hieroglyphs, or something truly alien, or perhaps just colorful scribbles, and it is certain the naysayers and luddites will proffer a plethora of […]

These are the first things I looked at when I awoke this morning

First release images of 7TeV collisions in the CMS detector, March 30,2010

Apologies folks, but I can’t resist the tendency to the poetic. It’s an irresistible force. Yes, they look like hieroglyphs, or something truly alien, or perhaps just colorful scribbles, and it is certain the naysayers and luddites will proffer a plethora of snarky remarks. And in all honesty, I could tell you very little about what the traces show – but for one thing.

These are a record of something utterly new, heretofore unknown, and never before seen in the entire history of what we collectively call ourselves – the human race.

We are truly at the dawn of a new era. Not just for physics, but perhaps for everything we understand.

How can one make such a bold, perhaps foolhardy statement?

Keep in mind a passel of physicists with tons of graphite in a field house at the University of Chicago some 60-odd years ago. Or even earlier in the 1850′s, when an English tinkerer moved a magnet over some coiled wire. Those are just a couple of things that changed the world forever – and made our world what it is.

Now we – humanity – are looking deep into the pieces of the bits of shards of atoms and beyond into who-knows-where. Just like Fermi at Pile 1 and Faraday in his study, and all the rest who knew not what they were looking at, except that what they were looking at was new.

So the statement is not so bold, or foolhardy. It is in fact, certainty.

UCSD-TV will be chronicling the advent of this journey as we provide a unique perspective through the exploits of UCSD Professor of Physics Vivek Sharma and his graduate student, Matt LeBourgeois. Here is a preview of material we recorded just days before the start of the journey.

Click here to view the embedded video.

More will be coming as the collisions continue and the journey proceeds.

You can follow along with near real-time views of LHC and CMS status, as well as see collision images here. You can even put it on your iPhone….like, as my daughter is apt to remind me, the “inner” (or some might say not-so-inner) nerd in me did…

Another interesting blog to glimpse a different perspective of the journey is here, provided by CMS e-commentators Darin Acosta, Dave Barney and Lindsey Gray. A lot of it may as well be runes or Sanskrit to most of us – we’ll work on translating as much of it as we can as this project evolves, but I’m fascinated by it because it is a unique chronicle of what is a wholly new, and certain to be, fantastic journey.