Disaster Preparedness: Behind-The-Scenes Photos

Check out these behind-the-scenes photos from Disaster Preparedness for Health Professionals.

Check out these behind-the-scenes photos from Disaster Preparedness for Health Professionals.

UCTV Producer Jennifer Ford (left) and Dr. John Blossom check out the monitors and prep for the day’s shoot. Photo by Peter Kreklow

Producer Jennifer Ford (left) interviews Dennis Amundson, CAPT. Photo by Peter Kreklow

A view from behind the camera. Photo by Peter Kreklow

The UCTV crew shooting on location, Calit2 studio, UC San Diego. Photo by Andy Hall

(From left) Patty Skoglund, RN, Dr. John Blossom, and Producer Jennifer Ford doing some pre-interview prep. Photo by Peter Kreklow

Emmy Win for Philip Glass, La Jolla Symphony Documentary

(PRESS RELEASE) LA JOLLA, CA— UCSD-TV took home the Emmy Award in the Entertainment-Program or Special category for “La Jolla Symphony & Chorus: Philip Glass’ Cello Concerto.” UCSD-TV’s Arts and Humanities producer John Menier accepted the award — his fifth career Emmy win and UCSD-TV’s thirteenth — at the June 13 ceremony in downtown San […]

(PRESS RELEASE) LA JOLLA, CA— UCSD-TV took home the Emmy Award in the Entertainment-Program or Special category for “La Jolla Symphony & Chorus: Philip Glass’ Cello Concerto.” UCSD-TV’s Arts and Humanities producer John Menier accepted the award — his fifth career Emmy win and UCSD-TV’s thirteenth — at the June 13 ceremony in downtown San Diego.

The award-winning program features La Jolla Symphony & Chorus’ North American premiere of Glass’ “Cello Concerto” and interviews with renowned cellist Wendy Sutter, conductor Steven Schick, and the composer himself.

UCSD-TV and La Jolla Symphony & Chorus have created an ongoing partnership to produce programs that showcase performances and behind-the-scenes interviews with the artists. Two new programs will debut on UCSD-TV in July, including Evan Ziporyn’s “Frog’s Eye” with Tijuana-based dance troupe Lux Boreal, and “Passion,” featuring Elgar’s “Cello Concerto” with guest cellist Maya Beiser. Broadcast information is available at www.ucsd.tv/lajollasymphony.

Watch the Entire Program:

Body Politic Behind-the-Scenes Photos, 2008

The Body Politic: World Views of USA, June 2008

A discussion with Stephan Haggard and Karen Ferree on how the American presidential campaign is being viewed in Europe, Africa and Asia followed by an interview with Philip Gourevitch on US soldiers at the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq.


Producer Shannon Bradley discusses topics for
the show with host Peter Gourevitch and guests Karen Ferree and Stephan Haggard.
Photo by Juanita LaHaye


Peter Gourevitch, Karen Ferree, and Stephan Haggard get acquainted on the set of The Body Politic.
Photo by Juanita LaHaye


Camera operator Harry Caruso readies the camera and teleprompter for the day’s shoot.
Photo by Juanita LaHaye


UCSD-TV crew member Alan Thwaites checks the microphones before taping begins.
Photo by Juanita LaHaye


A camera operator’s view.
Photo by Juanita LaHaye

Interview with Body Politic Program Host Peter Gourevitch, 2008

Since 1996, The Body Politic has been examining the issues creating local, national, and international news. After a brief hiatus, the series has returned with a new, yet familiar, host: Peter Gourevitch, professor of political science at UCSD . We asked him to tell us a bit more about the series and what we can expect to see in the future.

UCSD-TV: Welcome back to The Body Politic! What prompted you to return to television?

Peter Gourevitch: I had a great experience hosting the show ten years ago and with so many important things happening now in the world and in the U.S. it seemed a good opportunity to discuss important issues with the public.

UCSD-TV: Why is it important for UCSD faculty to participate in televised discussions about issues of the day?

PG: An informed citizenship is vital to a healthy democracy. Anything the faculty can do to help inform people we should do. My colleagues know lots of valuable things and I’d like to help them communicate it to the general public. You can read about these issues in the newspapers or online but there is something more direct about hearing from someone who is part of our community.

UCSD-TV: The Body Politic premiered on UCSD-TV in 1996. How has the political climate changed since the show began? Or has it?

PG: The political climate seems even more polarized than it was ten years ago. The difficulties we face in the U.S. and in the world have gone up – Iraq, the economy, the environment, inequality, infrastructure in the U.S., education – these have all increased as problems of concern.

UCSD-TV: What topics can the audience expect to be explored on upcoming episodes of the show? Immigration? Health care? Foreign policy?

PG: Yes, all of these issues: foreign policy, immigration, the economy, health, the environment. It is a matter of matching expertise, availability and the topic. Our constraint is time!

SummerFest 2007: Interview with Executive Producer John Menier

La Jolla Music Society and UCSD-TV have forged a unique partnership to share the magic of Summerfest with television and web audiences. We asked executive producer John Menier to tell us a bit more about the history and making of the series. UCSD-TV: How did UCSD-TV’s partnership with La Jolla Music Society’s Summerfest begin? JOHN […]

La Jolla Music Society and UCSD-TV have forged a unique partnership to share the magic of Summerfest with television and web audiences. We asked executive producer John Menier to tell us a bit more about the history and making of the series.

UCSD-TV: How did UCSD-TV’s partnership with La Jolla Music Society’s Summerfest begin?

JOHN MENIER: The exact details are shrouded in the mists of time, but I first made contact with La Jolla Music Society in 1993. At that time I was interested in one particular event, an appearance by composer Bright Sheng at the Athanaeum Music Library in La Jolla. The resulting program turned out very well, and over the next few years we gradually developed an enduring partnership with the Society.

UCSD-TV: What are some of your favorite moments from past Summerfest seasons?

JM: I’m fascinated by rehearsals, and I love documenting the creative process. As a fan of, and advocate for, new music, it’s been a particular treat to watch such creative talents as Tan Dun, John Adams, Chick Corea and Wayne Shorter refine their work with some of the world’s best musicians, and to share their processes with a wider audience. The opportunity to interview them is a rare privelege as well.

There are many favorite moments. I have fond memories of L’Histoire du Soldat with conductor Esa-Pekka Salonen, narrator John Rubinstein and choreographer John Malashock; Tan Dun’s Ghost Opera, with violinist Cho-Liang Lin and pipa virtuoso Wu Man; John Adams rehearsing his Shaker Loops; Richard Tognetti and the Australian Chamber Orchestra rehearsing their SummerFest concert; and the blending of chamber music and contemporary choreography by Allyson Green, especially for Tan Dun’s Elegy: Snow in June, an exciting and profoundly moving piece which featured UCSD’s own master percussionist, Steven Schick.

UCSD-TV: Shooting a live performance is quite different from shooting a studio interview. What are the primary challenges and what is a typical Summerfest shoot like?

JM: The biggest challenge is reconciling the intricate demands of multi-camera television production with the presenter’s requirements for live performance. We simply don’t have the same control over the concert venue that we take for granted in the studio. It’s really a process of negotiation, with regard to lighting, camera and microphone placement, and audio recording. I work closely with SummerFest’s production staff and stage management to ensure that we get what we need without compromising the performance, or inconveniencing the concert musicians or patrons. Fortunately, over time we’ve earned the Society’s trust, which makes my job much easier, as does the quality of their staff and of our production crew. It’s been a mutually respectful and beneficial partnership.

UCSD-TV: What can the UCSD-TV audience expect from this season’s performances?

JM: As in seasons past, viewers can expect SummerFest’s eclectic blend of established chamber repertoire, overlooked works by renowned composers, and new music commissioned for the festival. And, since I just can’t seem to stay out of rehearsals, you can expect behind-the-scenes footage and interviews with composers and musicians. Beginning this year, viewers may also visit our website for “bonus features” such as extended interviews, pre-concert lectures, etc. It’s all part of our determination to add value to the viewer’s experience by going beyond the concert hall.

Watch online videos and learn more about La Jolla Music Society SummerFest.