Research Universities & Economic Growth with Chancellor Khosla

Since beginning his tenure as UC San Diego’s eighth chancellor in August 2012, Pradeep Khosla hasn’t wasted any time getting to know his campus and the region within which it resides. Now he’s ready to make his case for the economic value that research universities like UC San Diego create within their surrounding regions and the nation.

Tune in tonight (March 4) at 8pm for “The Role of a Research University on Economic Development,” also available online, during which Chancellor Khosla argues for investing in research universities. He points to the successes of UC San Diego in attracting $1 billion a year in research funding, spawning hundreds of new companies in telecommunications and biotechnology.

Don't Let a Shoulder Injury Get You Down

Ouch!

No injury is good, but a tweaked shoulder can be especially inconvenient and downright uncomfortable.

A complex and unstable joint like the shoulder is often prone to injury. Luckily, there are many options for treatment.

On the latest edition of “Health Matters,” host David Granet welcomes Dr. Matthew Meunier, clinical professor at UC San Diego, to discuss treatments that may return patients to full function – whether that means a casual round of golf or competitive swimming.

Watch “Shoulder Injury — Health Matters,” tonight at 8 on UCSD-TV, and online now.

Why We Make Music

Is it possible to define music? What is its utility? What needs does it serve? Does it have survival value? Is it biologically necessary? Are humans inherently musical?

In the second installment of the fascintating “To Be Musical” series, saxophonist and educator David Borgo uses audio and video examples from around the globe and draws on historical, psychological, neurological and cultural research on music making to explore why we make music, ultimately arguing that music is a universal human phenomenon, but not a universal language.

Don’t miss “To Be Musical: David Borgo,” airing on UCSD-TV and available online.

If you missed the series debut, “On the Bridge: The Beginnings of Contemporary Percussion Music” with the incomparable Steven Schick, you can watch it at the series page, where you’ll also see what’s to come in the rest of this 6-part series, presented by UC San Diego’s Eleanor Roosevelt College.

Alzheimer’s Prevention Program: Keep Your Brain Healthy for the Rest of Your Life

Someone in America is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s every 68 seconds. Is there a way to keep this disease at bay?

Dr. Gary Small, a professor of psychiatry and director of the UCLA Longevity Center at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior, suggests there may be.

In “Alzheimer’s Prevention Program: Keep Your Brain Healthy for the Rest of Your Life,” Dr. Small examines the connection between lifestyle choices and susceptibility and offers physical and mental preventative strategies, including stress relief and cross-training your brain.

The program premieres on UCSD-TV tonight (Feb. 14) at 8pm, or get a jump on your brain betterment by watching it now online.

Also make sure to watch UCTV Prime’s original webseries,“Heartache & Hope: America’s Alzheimer’s Epidemic,” featuring Dr. Small and his UCLA colleagues who’ve made some promising strides in their Alzheimer’s research.

Want more healthy aging help? Check out the other programs from UC San Diego’s Stein Institute for Research on Aging at our website.

Can the World Breathe Easy?

UCTV Prime’s series “Lifting the Blanket: The Pursuit of a Climate Change Solution” has been following  the remarkable journey of Scripps Institution of Oceanography’s Veerabhadran Ramanathan, whose scientific curiosity took him from a refrigeration plant in his native country of India to becoming a globally recognized leader in climate change research.

Episodes one and two tracked the progress of his groundbreaking research that identified the significant contribution of CFCs and black carbon soot to global warming. In episode 3, “Can the World Breathe Easy?,” Ramanathan returns to India with an international collaboration to demonstrate that improving cooking methods in the developing world could slow global warming and improve public health along the way.

Watch episode 3 now, or catch up with Ramanthan’s quest to find human-scale solutions to climate change at the series website. Stay tuned February 12 for the fourth and final installment, “Scientific Authority Meets Moral Authority.”