Higgs Boson Discovery? NOT. Yet….But your search is over.

Here it is, the latest interpretation of the largest dataset from the CMS that was officially released this morning. After weeks of leaks, rumors and speculation it has been officially announced that the Higgs boson has been further cornered into a very narrow sliver of mass around 125GeV by independent results from both the CMS […]

CMS data showing mass range excluded and possible for the Higgs boson, December 2011

CMS data showing detail of lower mass range excluded and possible for the Higgs boson, December 2011

Here it is, the latest interpretation of the largest dataset from the CMS that was officially released this morning.

After weeks of leaks, rumors and speculation it has been officially announced that the Higgs boson has been further cornered into a very narrow sliver of mass around 125GeV by independent results from both the CMS and ATLAS detectors. This is consistent with the Standard Model and previous postulates made before the acquisition of humanity’s most powerful particle accelerator.

Is this the first evidence of the Higgs boson? It could well be, perhaps. But it is still not yet a discovery.

Why?

What do these mean?

What do they show?

And how did thousands of scientists get to this point in the search for the Higgs boson?

In this UCSD-TV video exclusive,  UC San Diego Physics Professor Vivek Sharma, director of Higgs research for the CMS detector, explains the massive efforts to discover the Higgs Boson using the LHC at CERN.

Since the search began in March 2010, I have been fortunate (very fortunate) to be able to conduct an unprecedented series of exclusive interviews with Vivek Sharma; UC San Diego Professor of Physics and director of Higgs research for the CMS, or Compact Muon Solenoid detector.He is also one of two people responsible for combining all results from both the CMS and ATLAS detectors – both involving teams of University of California physicists.

In excerpts from some of these interviews Professor Sharma, ok, Vivek, shares his insights from his unique perspective as one of the key figures at the very heart of this gargantuan effort. He provides a detailed, comprehensive but clear and accessible layman’s guide to how this massive team of researchers conducted the science and produced these results, what they look for, what they see, how they (may have) cornered the Higgs, and why they do what they do.

You will be able to understand what this shows, and why it is no longer evidence for the Higgs boson

Golden channel ZZ event

Not the Higgs. Why?

And you will be able to understand why this could be evidence for the Higgs boson.

Evidence of the Higgs boson?

You will also understand what the seemingly all-too-complex “Brazilian Flag” (above, apologies to Brazil) states so eloquently about hundreds of trillions of proton-proton collision events, putting them all in terms of the chances that what we are seeing might finally be evidence of the “God Particle”.

But more importantly, you will get a sense of why Vivek, and collectively, we, sift through this chatter and noise to find the signal of the Higgs boson, a signal that speaks to something that has always been, and will always remain, at the core of each of us.

Monthly Highlights: August 2011

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Featured This Month
Program Highlights
New to Video On-Demand


FEATURED THIS MONTH

Aging Isn’t Easy

It’s true that aging isn’t easy, but research and lifestyle tips from UC San Diego experts can help. Tune in Thursday nights to discover the latest in healthy aging, including a discussion about menopause and keeping your brain active as you age.

Research on Aging: The Aging Brain

Health Matters: Menopause

More aging programs at www.ucsd.tv/aging

Life Beneath the Sea

Discover the mysteries of marine life with these “Perspectives on Ocean Science” programs from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Birch Aquarium, Wednesday nights in August.

Sharks

Sea Turtles of Indonesian New Guinea

New Discoveries in Deep-Sea Animal Diversity

Gulf of California’s Deep-Sea Secrets

Listening to Whales

Diabetes: Setting Manageable Goals


Our award-winning series “Taking Control of Your Diabetes” (TCOYD) continues with a discussion of setting realistic goals to successfully manage this complex disease. Dr. Steven Edelman talks with Angela Norton, RN, and diabetes patient Chet Carney about setting goals tailored for your lifestyle and creative tips to stay on track.

Taking Control of Your Diabetes: Setting Manageable Goals


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

All programs repeat throughout the month. Visit the Program Schedule on our web site for additional air dates and times.

Health & Medicine

Celiac Disease and Gluten: Facts, Fiction & Controversies

Health Matters: Personalized Medicine and Drug Safety

More >>

Science

CARTA: Uniquely Human Gene Regulation, Signaling Networks and Gene Changes

More >>


Public Affairs

Same Sex Marriage: Past, Present, and Future

More >>

HumanitiesHumanities

Kamza and Bar Kamza
Featuring an interactive website to enrich the TV viewing experience!

Deborah Lipstadt: The Eichmann Trial

More >>

Arts & Music Arts & Music

Symphony of Clouds: Musical Adventures of the Boy Mozart

Robert Polito and Patricia Patterson: Farber on Film

More >>


Check out the latest additions to our online video archive

Osher UCSD: Redrawing Lines Between Chimps and Humans

Children and Armed Conflict: The International Response

La Jolla Symphony & Chorus: Concerto

More videos and podcasts>>

New series from CARTA

Last December CARTA, the UC San Diego / Salk Center for Advanced Research and Training in Anthropogeny, brought together experts to discuss The Evolution of Human Altruism, that uniquely human (or is it?) trait that would compel one, as Donald Pfaff of Rockefeller University related, to throw himself in front of a speeding train to save […]

Last December CARTA, the UC San Diego / Salk Center for Advanced Research and Training in Anthropogeny, brought together experts to discuss The Evolution of Human Altruism, that uniquely human (or is it?) trait that would compel one, as Donald Pfaff of Rockefeller University related, to throw himself in front of a speeding train to save the life of another human being that he has never met – or with whom he doesn’t even share the same racial phenotype….while leaving his own offspring behind…

Why? Do lions do that? Do chimps? How do we even define altruism? How do we study it? Does it define us, and our humanity?

In the same inimitable manner as all CARTA symposia, the eminent experts from all fields help us grapple with this enduring, very human, mystery.

CARTA’s Evolution of Human Altruism series premieres April 13 at 9pm on UCSD-TV and continues each subsequent Wednesday through April.

FREE MONEY!

Ha! Made you look! As Google reworks its search algorithm, I thought I’d try to snare the unsuspecting…I thought about using “sex” and “nude,” but thought better of the unsuspecting trawlers that those searches might snare….. So, now you’re here.You won’t get free money, but you’ll get something better…go to these links and you will […]

Ha! Made you look!

As Google reworks its search algorithm, I thought I’d try to snare the unsuspecting…I thought about using “sex” and “nude,” but thought better of the unsuspecting trawlers that those searches might snare…..

So, now you’re here.You won’t get free money, but you’ll get something better…go to these links and you will learn something that could change your life, or even improve the lives of many of your fellow citizens who, whether they know it or not, have been positively impacted by the work being done within the University of California. Now more than ever, we need this reminder.

First check out these videos from Harvard Law Professor Lawrence Lessig. I recommend that you watch them all….but start with this one – Republic Lost. Professor Lessig makes some fascinating arguments, but when he needed all of that valuable information on high fructose corn syrup, he turned to Dr. Robert Lustig, a UCSF scientist who studies the roots of metabolic syndrome and, in this popular talk “Sugar: The Bitter Truth,” describes in incontrovertible chemical detail how HFCS destroys human health.

Dr.Lustig didn’t make it up…he just elucidated the facts. What we do with them is another thing. Like the facts you’ll find at Keep California’s Promise, about the cost to restore this state’s near-decimated public education system.

Yeah, if you do the math, it’s just a dime a day…think you can handle it? But then again, if we let the UC decay, we won’t have to deal with understanding problems like how to grapple with a preventable disease epidemic that currently costs this nation over 170 billion dollars A YEAR…besides that little problem of destroying the health of the next generation.

It isn’t only the brilliant medical researchers at UCSF that are engaged in this battle – coming in April Steve Kay, Dean of UC San Diego’s number one ranked biological sciences program in the nation, will share how his lab’s research to understand our own biological clocks can help fight diabetes.

And then there is this other little problem we face– enter the UC…..UC Davis to be exact. Peruse these recent research findings on renewable energy from the Institute of Transportation Studies to see the facts for yourself.

Or watch this UCSD video on “Powering the Planet” to get the facts that might very well scare you, as they did me.

But then again, they’re just the facts. And they’re free. Courtesy of the University of California….

Darwin was a Creationist…and new perspective on the California Redemption Value

At the CARTA Symposium on Early Hominids, held October 1, 2010 at UC San Diego, UC Berkeley’s Tim White, better known for directing the team that brought Ardipithecus Ramidus, or “Ardi” to light, commented on Charles Darwin: “175 years ago, Charles Darwin visited the Galapagos. He arrived at the Galapagos as a creationist, and he […]

At the CARTA Symposium on Early Hominids, held October 1, 2010 at UC San Diego, UC Berkeley’s Tim White, better known for directing the team that brought Ardipithecus Ramidus, or “Ardi” to light, commented on Charles Darwin:

“175 years ago, Charles Darwin visited the Galapagos. He arrived at the Galapagos as a creationist, and he left the Galapagos as a creationist.”

Darwin, of course, was a keen observer. And he not only left the Galapagos as a creationist, he also left with many observations of the natural world–observations he used to help develop his idea of evolution by natural selection. His ideas were based on the physical evidence the natural world presented him. And you’ll get the same opportunity with these new talks from this fascinating CARTA symposium.

OK, you won’t get a trip to the Galapagos, but you will get a journey through time from all over Africa in a dazzling array of evidence presented directly to you by the individuals who are digging, unearthing and bringing to light — in shards, bits of teeth, phalanges, crania and climatic records — the evidence, the record, the hard proof of the very, very early history of Hominids – our Clade, our Family.

It is one of, if not the most, complete and compelling collections of evidence on this subject I have ever seen presented to the public and, as Tim exhorts at the beginning of the symposium, “there has never been a symposium like this, and it is exceedingly unlikely that there will ever be another one.”

Don’t miss the series. Really, don’t. It starts airing every Wednesday night in February, beginning February 2 with Tim White’s fascinating and compelling overview of the search for evidence of our earliest ancestors, and Andrew Hill’s vivid picture of what our earliest ancestors’ world looked like, and how it influenced their evolution.

On another note, a dime a day, just one thin dime….actually, less than one thin dime….two CRV redemptions…”What?” You say?

You may be aware of the dire future facing the University of California and public education as a whole. To gain a little perspective, here are some amazing facts and research about the financial future of public education or, more accurately, what it could be, and how little it would really take. Do the math, it’s all there, more than you need, really…and well, the math doesn’t lie.