Local Legends: The Leopard Sharks of La Jolla Shores

Summertime in San Diego means the return of leopard sharks to La Jolla Shores. Contrary to popular belief, these sharks – 97% of which are pregnant females – are not giving birth or mating during their stay.

Tonight (Oct. 10) at 8, join Andy Nosal, a Scripps Ph.D. student who studies local leopards, to find out what scientists really think is going on. Discover what gadgets Nosal uses to track the sharks and learn what makes La Jolla the animals’ preferred hang out. Find out why this shark population is particularly vulnerable and how the local no-take marine reserve protects it.

Or just watch it online now!

Local Legends: The Leopard Sharks of La Jolla Shores

In Memoriam: Reach for the Stars with Sally Ride

UCTV's "Reach for the Stars with Sally Ride"

Sadly, we learned today that Sally Ride, the first American woman in space, UC San Diego Professor Emeritus, and an advocate for science education, passed away at her home in San Diego. She was 61.

The UC San Diego campus, where Ride became Professor of Physics in 1989, is already relatively quiet this summer break, but the news of Ride’s premature passing due to pancreatic cancer has created a more somber tone. Her loss will obviously also be felt at the San Diego-based company she founded, Sally Ride Science, which provided science education materials and assistance to teachers and schools.

In February 2011, Ride visited UC Berkeley to deliver the UC Berkeley Physics Regent’s Lecture titled “Reach for the Stars with Sally Ride.” In the talk, which aired on UCSD-TV last April, Ride advocates for a stronger foundation of math and science education by describing her own path into the space program. There’s no better way to honor this distinguished woman’s memory than listening to her heartfelt dream that every student — not just future rocket scientists — learn to love math and science.

Higgs Boson Discovery? NOT. Yet….But your search is over.

Here it is, the latest interpretation of the largest dataset from the CMS that was officially released this morning. After weeks of leaks, rumors and speculation it has been officially announced that the Higgs boson has been further cornered into a very narrow sliver of mass around 125GeV by independent results from both the CMS […]

CMS data showing mass range excluded and possible for the Higgs boson, December 2011

CMS data showing detail of lower mass range excluded and possible for the Higgs boson, December 2011

Here it is, the latest interpretation of the largest dataset from the CMS that was officially released this morning.

After weeks of leaks, rumors and speculation it has been officially announced that the Higgs boson has been further cornered into a very narrow sliver of mass around 125GeV by independent results from both the CMS and ATLAS detectors. This is consistent with the Standard Model and previous postulates made before the acquisition of humanity’s most powerful particle accelerator.

Is this the first evidence of the Higgs boson? It could well be, perhaps. But it is still not yet a discovery.

Why?

What do these mean?

What do they show?

And how did thousands of scientists get to this point in the search for the Higgs boson?

In this UCSD-TV video exclusive,  UC San Diego Physics Professor Vivek Sharma, director of Higgs research for the CMS detector, explains the massive efforts to discover the Higgs Boson using the LHC at CERN.

Since the search began in March 2010, I have been fortunate (very fortunate) to be able to conduct an unprecedented series of exclusive interviews with Vivek Sharma; UC San Diego Professor of Physics and director of Higgs research for the CMS, or Compact Muon Solenoid detector.He is also one of two people responsible for combining all results from both the CMS and ATLAS detectors – both involving teams of University of California physicists.

In excerpts from some of these interviews Professor Sharma, ok, Vivek, shares his insights from his unique perspective as one of the key figures at the very heart of this gargantuan effort. He provides a detailed, comprehensive but clear and accessible layman’s guide to how this massive team of researchers conducted the science and produced these results, what they look for, what they see, how they (may have) cornered the Higgs, and why they do what they do.

You will be able to understand what this shows, and why it is no longer evidence for the Higgs boson

Golden channel ZZ event

Not the Higgs. Why?

And you will be able to understand why this could be evidence for the Higgs boson.

Evidence of the Higgs boson?

You will also understand what the seemingly all-too-complex “Brazilian Flag” (above, apologies to Brazil) states so eloquently about hundreds of trillions of proton-proton collision events, putting them all in terms of the chances that what we are seeing might finally be evidence of the “God Particle”.

But more importantly, you will get a sense of why Vivek, and collectively, we, sift through this chatter and noise to find the signal of the Higgs boson, a signal that speaks to something that has always been, and will always remain, at the core of each of us.

Monthly Highlights: August 2011

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Featured This Month
Program Highlights
New to Video On-Demand


FEATURED THIS MONTH

Aging Isn’t Easy

It’s true that aging isn’t easy, but research and lifestyle tips from UC San Diego experts can help. Tune in Thursday nights to discover the latest in healthy aging, including a discussion about menopause and keeping your brain active as you age.

Research on Aging: The Aging Brain

Health Matters: Menopause

More aging programs at www.ucsd.tv/aging

Life Beneath the Sea

Discover the mysteries of marine life with these “Perspectives on Ocean Science” programs from Scripps Institution of Oceanography and Birch Aquarium, Wednesday nights in August.

Sharks

Sea Turtles of Indonesian New Guinea

New Discoveries in Deep-Sea Animal Diversity

Gulf of California’s Deep-Sea Secrets

Listening to Whales

Diabetes: Setting Manageable Goals


Our award-winning series “Taking Control of Your Diabetes” (TCOYD) continues with a discussion of setting realistic goals to successfully manage this complex disease. Dr. Steven Edelman talks with Angela Norton, RN, and diabetes patient Chet Carney about setting goals tailored for your lifestyle and creative tips to stay on track.

Taking Control of Your Diabetes: Setting Manageable Goals


PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

All programs repeat throughout the month. Visit the Program Schedule on our web site for additional air dates and times.

Health & Medicine

Celiac Disease and Gluten: Facts, Fiction & Controversies

Health Matters: Personalized Medicine and Drug Safety

More >>

Science

CARTA: Uniquely Human Gene Regulation, Signaling Networks and Gene Changes

More >>


Public Affairs

Same Sex Marriage: Past, Present, and Future

More >>

HumanitiesHumanities

Kamza and Bar Kamza
Featuring an interactive website to enrich the TV viewing experience!

Deborah Lipstadt: The Eichmann Trial

More >>

Arts & Music Arts & Music

Symphony of Clouds: Musical Adventures of the Boy Mozart

Robert Polito and Patricia Patterson: Farber on Film

More >>


Check out the latest additions to our online video archive

Osher UCSD: Redrawing Lines Between Chimps and Humans

Children and Armed Conflict: The International Response

La Jolla Symphony & Chorus: Concerto

More videos and podcasts>>

New series from CARTA

Last December CARTA, the UC San Diego / Salk Center for Advanced Research and Training in Anthropogeny, brought together experts to discuss The Evolution of Human Altruism, that uniquely human (or is it?) trait that would compel one, as Donald Pfaff of Rockefeller University related, to throw himself in front of a speeding train to save […]

Last December CARTA, the UC San Diego / Salk Center for Advanced Research and Training in Anthropogeny, brought together experts to discuss The Evolution of Human Altruism, that uniquely human (or is it?) trait that would compel one, as Donald Pfaff of Rockefeller University related, to throw himself in front of a speeding train to save the life of another human being that he has never met – or with whom he doesn’t even share the same racial phenotype….while leaving his own offspring behind…

Why? Do lions do that? Do chimps? How do we even define altruism? How do we study it? Does it define us, and our humanity?

In the same inimitable manner as all CARTA symposia, the eminent experts from all fields help us grapple with this enduring, very human, mystery.

CARTA’s Evolution of Human Altruism series premieres April 13 at 9pm on UCSD-TV and continues each subsequent Wednesday through April.