The Atlantic Meets the Pacific: Predicting Election 2012

There was plenty of excitement earlier this month when two coasts collided at UC San Diego. No, it wasn’t some strange weather phenomenon but the second annual “The Atlantic Meets the Pacific,” hosted by The Atlantic magazine and UCSD. The sold-out, three-day forum brought together some of the country’s most fascinating thinkers to talk about the future of energy, health and technology.

We’ll be premiering these outstanding discussions in November, but there was one that simply couldn’t wait. In “Predicting Election 2012,” veteran political reporter Ron Brownstein of the National Journal and Republican strategist Steve Schmidt analyze the homestretch of the presidential campaign with input from James Fallows, National Correspondent for The Atlantic; Sam Popkin, UC San Diego professor and author of “The Candidate;” James Fowler, a UC San Diego professor who specializes in the biochemistry of political behavior: and longtime pollster Dan Yankelovich. Look for some fresh insight from these lively and connected pundits as they call the fates of Mitt Romney, Barack Obama and the next Congress.

Watch “Predicting Election 2012” on October 26 at 7pm — or online now — and make sure to come back in November for more in “The Atlantic Meets the Pacific” series, including conversations with Dreamworks’ Stacey Snider, Facebook’s Chris Cox, “The Happiness Project” author Gretchen Rubin and much more.

It’s A Great Time To Be Sam Popkin

by Shannon Bradley UC San Diego political scientist Sam Popkin has a wonderful new book out called “The Candidate: What It Takes To Win — and Hold – The White House” and for political junkies like me, it’s pure heaven. So many great stories about the inner workings of campaigns that, when viewed together, show […]

by Shannon Bradley

UC San Diego political scientist Sam Popkin has a wonderful new book out called “The Candidate: What It Takes To Win — and Hold – The White House” and for political junkies like me, it’s pure heaven. So many great stories about the inner workings of campaigns that, when viewed together, show patterns among successful and failed candidates.

The book’s getting all sorts of attention, my favorite review is here in the Washington Post, and he continues his online chats with James Fallows at theatlantic.com, in what Fallows teasingly calls, “Ask Dr. Popkin.”

I had the pleasure of talking with Sam about his book and the presidential election in the downtime between the conventions and the debates. Our conversation lasted more than an hour but we’ll present his commentary in short, web-friendly chunks on our YouTube channel, UCTV Prime.

We’re starting today with The Candidate: Debate Prep, given that Obama and Romney are well into that right now, with Sam’s insight into how it feels to stand face to face with the president, and repeat what’s being said about him on the campaign trail. As Jim Lehrer would say, “Tension City!

Next up, Popkin evaluates how Romney is doing as The Challenger and Obama as The Incumbent. We’ll get to Sam’s thoughts on The Successor when we have time. It may not be relevant in this election, but if Obama prevails in November, it could become so in 2016.

Channeling Judy Woodruff

Early in my career, I had the wonderful job of preparing political segments for Jim Lehrer, Robin MacNeil and Judy Woodruff for the PBS nightly program, then called the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour.  It was great fun because I got to pre-interview smart and connected people about issues of the day and recommend who should be invited […]

Shannon Bradley

Early in my career, I had the wonderful job of preparing political segments for Jim Lehrer, Robin MacNeil and Judy Woodruff for the PBS nightly program, then called the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour.  It was great fun because I got to pre-interview smart and connected people about issues of the day and recommend who should be invited to appear on the program that night.  Jim and Robin were first rate, of course, but the host who I admired the most was Judy.  She was calm, authoritative and classy.  She brought out the best in guests by presenting politics with such grace that she made it seem like the noblest of professions.

Well, some 20 years later, I’ve been thinking about Judy a lot as we launched a new political series, Prime: Vote on our YouTube original channel, UCTV Prime.   Each segment features the faculty of the University of California using their expertise to analyze what’s happening on the 2012 campaign trail.  We began the series in March with video commentaries from three UC professors on issues including the high cost of austerity, incumbents’ responsiveness to voters and the economic impact of immigration.

With today’s premiere of “Political Messaging on the Economy,” UCTV Prime moves from commentary into analysis, with me playing the role of the esteemed Ms. Woodruff as I talk to political scientists Lynn Vavreck of UCLA and Thad Kousser of UC San Diego about how Mitt Romney, Rick Santorum and Barack Obama are crafting their economic messages to appeal to voters.   It’s great talk from engaging professors who clearly enjoy politics. Thanks, Judy, for showing us how it’s done.

Learn more about UCSD-TV and UCTV Prime:Vote producer Shannon Bradley.

Ronald Reagan at 100: A Son Reminisces

February 6 would’ve been President Ronald Reagan’s 100th birthday and, while his name is so often invoked in political discussions, there’s still plenty to say about the man as, well, a man. In his new book “My Father at 100,” the President’s youngest child Ron sets out to do just that, and he stopped by […]

Ron Reagan at UCSD's Revelle Forum

February 6 would’ve been President Ronald Reagan’s 100th birthday and, while his name is so often invoked in political discussions, there’s still plenty to say about the man as, well, a man.

In his new book “My Father at 100,” the President’s youngest child Ron sets out to do just that, and he stopped by UC San Diego Extension’s Revelle Forum at the Neurosciences Institute to share some of his most endearing memories and frank opinions with Phyllis Pfeiffer, publisher of the La Jolla Light newspaper.

The affable Reagan describes the complicated, yet loving relationship he enjoyed with his father, even as his own political views veered decidedly to the left. A compelling storyteller like his father, Reagan steers clear of nitty gritty politics and lets us in on his own journey to understand the more private side of this very public man. It’s a respectful yet compelling conversation that all will enjoy, no matter what your politics.

Revelle Forum: Ron Reagan

What I Did This Summer

Shannon Bradley here, checking in at the tail end of summer. Summertime at UCSD is sweet.   The campus is quiet, lunch lines are short, parking is easy, and…most important for us, we mostly air re-runs in July and August.  All of that freed us up to focus on creating a new magazine-style series, premiering this […]

Shannon Bradley here, checking in at the tail end of summer.

Summertime at UCSD is sweet.   The campus is quiet, lunch lines are short, parking is easy, and…most important for us, we mostly air re-runs in July and August.  All of that freed us up to focus on creating a new magazine-style series, premiering this fall, that honors UC San Diego’s 50th anniversary. The six-part series, called  UCSD@50, premieres September 13, with a new installment  every six weeks through June of 2011.

As with all of my favorite magazines, this program will offer an eclectic menu of stories — some serious and some light-hearted –  all centered around our goal of sharing what excites us about this place. In the upcoming months, look for reports from Rich Wargo (Science), John Menier (Arts & Humanities), Jennifer Ford (Health and Medicine)…and yours truly on Public Affairs.

I’m starting the first show with a piece on UCSD’s Center for Community Well-Being. This group, run by Bud Mehan and Mike Cole, is a collection of faculty, staff and students who are doing research and service projects in Southeastern San Diego.  We spent some time with UCSD undergrads tutoring at Gompers Preparatory Academy, the middle school in Chollas View that’s modeled after our own Preuss School.

We also showed up for the first Community Market at the Jacobs Center, where free food and clothes were distributed to needy families under the guidance of the CCW’s Makeba Jones and her partners from Project Safe Way.

And finally, we visited the Town and Country Learning Center in Mountain View where Mike Cole and Srinivas Sukumar, from Cal IT 2, work with kids after school.  It was great to visit these communities and see UCSD folks engaged in finding ways to improve the lives of fellow San Diegans.

Also in the first show, Rebecca Tolin reports on the ground-breaking work that Eric Courchesne and Karen Pierce are doing at the UCSD Autism Center of Excellence. This husband-and-wife team has made startling discoveries about the brains of autistic children and what can be done to help those who are most at risk.

Later in the first show, Ken Kebow takes us to the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, where Dean Tony Haymet describes research on underwater plants that could lead to new medicines, and how new high-tech robots will help monitor the health of the oceans.

Oh, and Rachel Bradley (no, no relation) profiles Giancarlo Ruiz, a UCSD staffer who produced a film that was screened at Cannes! How cool is that? And yes, he made it on his own time.  Thanks to Sherman George for telling us about him.  Sherman retired awhile back but is still a presence around here…something we all appreciate.

So…lots going on here this summer. Next up is Chancellor Marye Anne Fox coming to our studio September 2 to tape her segments as the honorary host of our first program.  UCSD @50 will start airing Sept 13….just a week before the students come back (good!) and parking gets difficult again (not-so-good).