Leading Cancer Experts and Advances in Care

8232Cancer is a major public health problem worldwide and is the second leading cause of death in the United States. In 2016, an estimated 1,685,210 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in the United States and 595,690 people will die from the disease. But the number of people living beyond a cancer diagnosis is rising every year as medical knowledge increases.

Join the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center’s team for a series of discussions highlighting the latest advances in cancer research by UCSF’s distinguished physicians and scientists.

Engineering Immune Cells to Recognize and Kill Cancer
Find out how scientists are using immune proteins to mobilize immune cells to fight cancer.

Preventing Cancer: Genetics, Lifestyle, and Environment
Genetic testing, expanded screening, along with behavioral and lifestyle changes, may be the key.

Immunotherapy: Unleashing the Body’s Natural Defense Systems to Fight Cancer
Learn how immunotherapy research is leading to more precise treatments based on individual biology, tumors, and immune system response.

Personalizing Cancer Care and Treatment
Find out how genome-based analysis is providing critical information about the precise cancer type and giving clues about which therapy may be effective.

Patient-Centered Care in the 21st Century
What does patient-centered care look like in practice? How does it differ from the health care that most of us receive? What will it mean for patient health?

Poisonings, Overdoses, and Toxic Exposures

8232There are things in our environment that we know are dangerous like venomous snakes and poisons, and then there are substances that seem innocent but can be toxic, especially to children.

This new series from UCSF explores common medications, herbal therapies, and household chemicals that can make our lives healthier, more convenient, and better but when used incorrectly, either intentionally or inadvertently, they can become life-threatening poisons and toxins.

Learn about the latest designer and adulterated street drugs, toxic land and marine creatures, common household ingestions, misbegotten uses of herbal medications, and the way that we use the laboratory to solve poisoning mysteries.

Get more information on how to reduce your exposure to known toxins and how to safeguard yourselves from substances that have to potential to harm.

A Molecular Roadmap to Global Health

8232Immunologist Erica Ollman Saphire, an expert who has worked on the front lines in west Africa battling viral hemorrhagic fevers, gives a fascinating and sometimes frightening on-the-ground account of how something called the VIC global consortium developed the only effective strategy to fight the Ebola virus.

The VIC or Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Immunotherapeutic Consortium, was established in 2014 to develop life-saving antibody therapeutics against some of the world’s deadliest viruses. The VIC represents a field-wide collaboration in which all of the leading laboratories, from over 15 institutions, have united to develop the most efficacious antibody cocktail possible against Ebola virus.

In her presentation, Erica takes you inside the workings of how this collaborative effort allows each laboratory to contribute their strengths in analytical techniques towards the identification, characterization, and validation of antibodies against viruses like Ebola.

From isolating novel antibodies and testing them in vivo, to analyzing the structure of the molecular mechanism for Ebola neutralization, Erica shows how the VIC scientists each contribute unique insights towards the overall characterization of each antibody, and have ultimately established a method which could be used to defend against new diseases emerging in our world of global change.

Watch A Molecular Roadmap to Global Health presented by Saturday Science at The Scripps Research Institute.

Medical Care: More is Not Always Better

8232If some medical care is good, more must be better. Right?

Unfortunately, this is often not the case. In fact, the opposite can be true—some measures of health are worse in areas where people receive more health services.

Join leaders in research and health policy at UCSF who highlight situations in which the overuse of medical care may result in harm and in which less care is likely to result in better health. It’s time to challenge the implicit belief, on the part of both clinicians and patients, that more is better.

See what you should know about risks and benefits of cancer screening, “routine” examinations, alternative medicine, drug prescriptions, cardiac testing and end-of-life care.

Bottom line for consumers – choose wisely, change the question from Why don’t you do that test? to Why did you do that test?, and challenge the belief that more is better.

Check out all the latest programs in High Value Medical Care: Why Sometimes Less is More:

High Value Medical Care: Why Sometimes Less is More

We Don’t Always Get High Value Medical Care: Examples from Cataract Surgery and Telemedicine

Cardiac Screening – Why Sometimes Less is More

Too Many Tests and Treatments: Why More is Not Always Better For Seniors

Radiation Safety and Medical Imaging

Antibiotics – When Less is More

Vitamins and Supplements: Less is More

Cancer Screening: When Less is More

Periodic Health Examination – Why Sometimes Less is More

New Brain Channel Series on Movement Disorders

8232Moving is something we do without thinking but it’s not as simple as it may seem. Movement is an incredibly complex process that requires different parts of the brain working with muscles and nerves throughout the body. Signals move between the brain and the rest of the body controlling the coordination needed — but sometimes that system breaks down.

When that communication isn’t functioning properly it is referred to as a movement disorder. These neurological syndromes often begin slowly and progress over time. Many have genetics as the common cause. Parkinson’s is perhaps the best known as it affects approximately one million Americans and in most cases is caused by genetic predisposition or exposure to certain drugs and toxins.

The Brain Channel recently completed an eight part series on movement disorders and the amazing research that is happening at UC San Diego to better understand, treat and cope with these often devastating diseases. Join Dr. Bill Mobley, Distinguished Professor and Chair of the Department of Neurosciences at UC San Diego School of Medicine, as he welcomes physicians, researchers and clinicians to discuss their work and passion for seeking discoveries to alleviate the suffering associated with these disorders.

Take a few moments to learn what these dedicated researchers are doing by clicking on the videos below.

Parkinson’s Disease: New Developments and Therapies

Parkinson’s and Cognition

Parkinson’s Disease: Environmental Factors and Epidemiology

Huntington’s Disease

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP)

Brain Imaging and Understanding Movement Disorders

Advancing Research on Neurodegenerative Disease

Tracing the Molecular Roots of Neurodegenerative Diseases

Visit The Brain Channel to watch more programs that explore the brain.