Your Legs, Your Life: The Importance of a Healthy Lower Half – Research on Aging

8232The life expectancy of humans has increased fifty percent over the last century and is projected to continue lengthening in the coming decades. This comes with some potential issues. As we live longer, we develop more chronic conditions, including diabetes and high blood pressure that worsen the quality of life and increase health care costs.

Healthy, functional legs can help stave off some of these chronic conditions and are critical in maintaining a vibrant lifestyle, as well as preventing injury and disability, particularly among older individuals. Dr. Matthew Allison discusses the importance of sustaining healthy legs. He describes ways to maintain mobility and increase stamina and activity. Dr. Allison also talks about various diseases that impede leg function, such as peripheral arterial disease, chronic venous disease, and neuropathy in the legs; and potential treatment options in this Stein Institute for Research on Aging presentation.

Watch Your Legs, Your Life and browser other programs from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging.

Eating Disorders Explained

27760How do we manage our eating behaviors? What processes in the body affect how we view our relationship with food?

Walter Kaye, PhD, explores the biological impulses that affect anorexia nervosa and bulimia as well as new brain imaging techniques to help treat and understand eating disorders.

Watch The Science of Dieting: Why Is It Difficult for Most People, but Not Those with Anorexia Nervosa? online now.

Explore more programs in the Stein Institute for Research on Aging series.

Get the Sleep You Need

26070Lack of quality sleep not only affects our mood and ability to function – it also affects our health. Worse still, it can be dangerous to the people around us.

Failure to get adequate sleep poses a danger to society by contributing to traffic and industrial accidents. Some sleep disorders can even be life threatening. Jose S. Loredo, MD, MS, MPH, FCCP, professor of clinical medicine and medical director of the UC San Diego Sleep Medicine Center and VA Pulmonary Sleep Disorders Laboratory, discusses how these disorders can be managed and treated.

Don’t miss this episode from the Stein Institute for Research on Aging:

Sleep and Sleep Disorders in the Older Adult

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Health Matters with Dr. David Granet

33With the holiday season upon us, health becomes an ever-increasing issue as we battle stress, diet, and our environment. Dr. David Granet of Health Matters welcomes a variety of professionals from the health and medical fields to discuss a broad array of health related topics. Each program in the series provides current and valuable information on how to improve health and well-being. Recent episodes have focused on the negative effects of insufficient sleep, and the importance of urgent and innovative care for stroke patients.

25617The CDC has declared insufficient sleep to be a national health epidemic. Why are we not getting enough and how can we change our behaviors? Sean P.A. Drummond, PhD, director of the Behavioral Sleep Medicine Program and Cognitive Behavioral Interventions Program in the VA San Diego Healthcare System, joins host Dr. Granet to discuss the ramifications of insufficient sleep and ways to improve your sleep health.

25841Every 45 seconds, someone in the U.S. has a stroke. What are the warning signs and how do you know if you are at risk? In the most recent episode of the series, Innovations in the Treatment of Stroke, Dr. Alexander Khalessi, Director of Endovascular Neurosurgery and Surgical Director of Neurocritical Care, gives insight on how to recognize a stroke, preventative measures, and innovative surgical treatment options.

For more programs regarding health, visit the Health Matters series page.

Join the conversation @UCTelevision, @UCSDTV, @dgranet, @DeptVetAffairs, #HealthMatters

Skin Cancer Treatment and Prevention

Have you been wearing sunscreen this Summer? Sunburns might not be so bad, but the damage done to your skin can turn into something much more deadly.

Melanoma is the most dangerous type of skin cancer and is the number one cause of death from skin disease. It accounts for 5% of all cancer cases in men and 4% of all cancer cases in women.

According to medical oncologist Gregory A. Daniels, MD, PhD, the Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine in the Division of Hematology-Oncology at UC San Diego School of Medicine, the lifetime probability of developing Melanoma, is 1 in 36.

Unfortunately, the incidences of this disease are increasing. One hundred years ago, Melanoma was not a common problem. At that time, Daniels says the probability of developing Melanoma was more like 1 in 1,000 or even 1 in 1,500.

Watch “Skin Cancer Treatment and Prevention – Research on Aging” to find out why incidences of Melanoma are increasing and what you can do to treat or prevent this disease.

Watch other videos presented by the Stein Institute for Research on Aging!